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Open AccessArticle

Partial Substitution of Fermented Soybean Meal for Soybean Meal Influences the Carcass Traits and Meat Quality of Broiler Chickens

1
Engineering Research Center of Feed Protein Resources on Agricultural By-products, Ministry of Education, Hubei Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan 430023, China
2
Hubei (Wuhan) Broad Live-Stock Technique Co., Ltd., Wuhan 430071, China
3
Hubei Key Laboratory of Animal Embryo and Molecular Breeding, Institute of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Hubei Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Wuhan 430064, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The authors contributed equally to the work.
Animals 2020, 10(2), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10020225
Received: 26 December 2019 / Revised: 19 January 2020 / Accepted: 28 January 2020 / Published: 30 January 2020
Fungal and bacterial fermentation improves the nutritional quality of soybean meal (SBM). The beneficial effects of fermented soybean meal (FSBM) on growth performance and gut health of broiler chickens have been demonstrated. However, FSBM is usually used in pre-starter diets of broiler chickens due to the high cost. In the present study, the SBM in diets was partially replaced by FSBM to evaluate its effect on the growth performance, carcass traits, and meat quality of broiler chickens. The growth performance and major carcass traits were not significantly affected by FSBM treatments. Different levels (2.5%, 5.0%, and 7.5%) of FSBM supplementation influenced the meat color, pH, nutritional composition, and antioxidant properties. The improvement of meat quality would extend the shelf life of meat and increase consumer acceptability to chicken. The 2.5% FSBM was recommended in a broiler diet.
The usage of fermented soybean meal (FSBM) in poultry feed is limited due to the high cost. The present study was conducted to examine the carcass traits and meat quality of broiler chickens that were fed diets with partial replacement of soybean meal (SBM) with FSBM. The 336 one-day-old chicks were assigned to four groups with 0% (control), 2.5%, 5.0%, and 7.5% FSBM addition in corn-SBM-based diets. Compared with the control, 2.5% and 5.0% FSBM decreased leg muscle yield, breast drip loss, and cooking loss (p < 0.05). The 7.5% FSBM increased the ultimate pH of breast and thigh muscles, and all FSBM treatments decreased muscle lightness and breast malondialdehyde content (p < 0.05). The 2.5% FSBM increased breast total superoxide dismutase activity, while 7.5% FSBM reduced breast hydrogen peroxide level (p < 0.05). All FSBM treatments elevated breast contents of bitter and sour tasting amino acids, and 2.5% and 7.5% FSBM increased breast glutamic acid and total free amino acids (p < 0.05). The 5.0% and 7.5% FSBM elevated thigh isoleucine and leucine contents (p < 0.05). In conclusion, FSBM replacing SBM affected meat quality with the decrease of lightness and increase of pH, water-holding capacity, antioxidant properties, and free amino acids.
Keywords: broiler chicken; fermented soybean meal; growth performance; carcass trait; meat quality broiler chicken; fermented soybean meal; growth performance; carcass trait; meat quality
MDPI and ACS Style

Guo, S.; Zhang, Y.; Cheng, Q.; Xv, J.; Hou, Y.; Wu, X.; Du, E.; Ding, B. Partial Substitution of Fermented Soybean Meal for Soybean Meal Influences the Carcass Traits and Meat Quality of Broiler Chickens. Animals 2020, 10, 225.

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