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Evaluating Impacts of Different Omega-6 to Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratios in Corn–Soybean Meal-Based Diet on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, Blood Profiles, Fecal Microbial, and Gas Emission in Growing Pigs

Department of Animal Resource and Science, Dankook University, Cheonan-si, Chungnam 31116, Korea
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Animals 2020, 10(1), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10010042
Received: 3 November 2019 / Revised: 4 December 2019 / Accepted: 20 December 2019 / Published: 24 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Animal Nutrition)
There are two major classes of polyunsaturated fatty acids found in the diet, omega-3 and omega-6, these polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential because they cannot be synthesized by humans and animals. Also, they cannot be converted into each other in the body. Supplementation of omega-3 has been reported to improve the performance and health of pigs. However, during the past years, studies had demonstrated that animal performance could be influenced by the dietary level or the ratio of omega-6 and omega-3. A high omega-6: omega-3 ratio in diets promotes the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. An optimal omega-6: omega-3 ratio could inhibit immune stimulation to ensure the availability of more energy and nutrients for high performance and the homeostatic pathway. The present study investigated the effects of different omega-6: omega-3 ratios (17:1, 15:1, 10:1, 5:1) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood profiles, fecal microflora, and gas emission in growing pigs. The results of this study showed that reducing omega-6: omega-3 ratio from 17:1 to 5:1 by increasing omega-3 in the diet increased body weight, energy digestibility, and reduced the low-density lipoprotein concentrations of blood in growing pigs.
This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of different omega-6: omega-3 fatty acid (FA) ratios in a corn–soybean meal-based diet in growing pigs. A total of 140 [Duroc × (Landrace × Yorkshire)] growing pigs with an average body weight (BW) of 24.75 ± 1.43 kg were used in a 6-week trial. Pigs were allocated randomly into one of four treatments according to sex and BW (seven replications with five pigs per pen). The treatment groups consisted of 4 diets with omega-6:omega-3 FA ratios of 17:1, 15:1, 10:1, and 5:1. In the current study, the energy digestibility, BW, and average daily gain (ADG) increased (p < 0.05) in pigs provided with the 5:1 diet compared to pigs fed the 17:1 diet in the sixth week. The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations of blood were lower (p < 0.05) in pigs fed the 5:1 diet compared to the 17:1 and 15:1 diet. However, the fecal microflora and fecal gas emissions were unaffected (p > 0.05) by the different omega-6: omega-3 FA ratios in diets. In conclusion, reducing omega-6: omega-3 ratio by increasing omega-3 in diet improved BW, ADG, and gross energy digestibility, and reduced the LDL concentrations of blood in growing pigs. View Full-Text
Keywords: blood profile; fecal gas emission; fecal microbial; nutrient digestibility; omega-6: omega-3 fatty acids; growth performance blood profile; fecal gas emission; fecal microbial; nutrient digestibility; omega-6: omega-3 fatty acids; growth performance
MDPI and ACS Style

Nguyen, D.H.; Yun, H.M.; Kim, I.H. Evaluating Impacts of Different Omega-6 to Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratios in Corn–Soybean Meal-Based Diet on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, Blood Profiles, Fecal Microbial, and Gas Emission in Growing Pigs. Animals 2020, 10, 42.

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