Next Article in Journal
Characterization of Weissella viridescens UCO-SMC3 as a Potential Probiotic for the Skin: Its Beneficial Role in the Pathogenesis of Acne Vulgaris
Previous Article in Journal
Screening New Xylanase Biocatalysts from the Mangrove Soil Diversity
Article

Multiomics Profiling Reveals Signatures of Dysmetabolism in Urban Populations in Central India

1
NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
2
Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
3
Biochemistry Research Laboratory, Dr. G.M. Taori Central India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nagpur 440010, India
4
Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
5
Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29631, USA
6
MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
7
Department of Biosciences, John van Geest Cancer Research Centre, Centre for Health Aging and Understanding Disease, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
8
Glycoscience Research Laboratory, Genos Ltd., Borongajska cesta 83H, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
9
Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
10
School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
11
Department of Microbiology and Infection, King’s Mill Hospital, Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Trust, Sutton in Ashfield NG17 4JL, UK
12
Mahatma Gandhi Tribal Hospital, MAHAN Trust Melghat, Amravati 605006, India
13
Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
14
Institute of Translational Medicine, University Hospitals Birmingham, Foundation Trust, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
15
NIHR Surgical Reconstruction and Microbiology Research Centre, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2WB, UK
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Fabio Pace
Microorganisms 2021, 9(7), 1485; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071485
Received: 8 May 2021 / Revised: 27 June 2021 / Accepted: 7 July 2021 / Published: 12 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Gut Microbiota)
Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have become a major cause of morbidity and mortality in India. Perturbation of host–microbiome interactions may be a key mechanism by which lifestyle-related risk factors such as tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity may influence metabolic health. There is an urgent need to identify relevant dysmetabolic traits for predicting risk of metabolic disorders, such as diabetes, among susceptible Asian Indians where NCDs are a growing epidemic. Methods: Here, we report the first in-depth phenotypic study in which we prospectively enrolled 218 adults from urban and rural areas of Central India and used multiomic profiling to identify relationships between microbial taxa and circulating biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk. Assays included fecal microbiota analysis by 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing, quantification of serum short chain fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and multiplex assaying of serum diabetic proteins, cytokines, chemokines, and multi-isotype antibodies. Sera was also analysed for N-glycans and immunoglobulin G Fc N-glycopeptides. Results: Multiple hallmarks of dysmetabolism were identified in urbanites and young overweight adults, the majority of whom did not have a known diagnosis of diabetes. Association analyses revealed several host–microbe and metabolic associations. Conclusions: Host–microbe and metabolic interactions are differentially shaped by body weight and geographic status in Central Indians. Further exploration of these links may help create a molecular-level map for estimating risk of developing metabolic disorders and designing early interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: geography; host–microbe interactions; glycome; dysmetabolism; multiomics; diabetes mellitus geography; host–microbe interactions; glycome; dysmetabolism; multiomics; diabetes mellitus
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Monaghan, T.M.; Biswas, R.N.; Nashine, R.R.; Joshi, S.S.; Mullish, B.H.; Seekatz, A.M.; Blanco, J.M.; McDonald, J.A.K.; Marchesi, J.R.; Yau, T.o.; Christodoulou, N.; Hatziapostolou, M.; Pucic-Bakovic, M.; Vuckovic, F.; Klicek, F.; Lauc, G.; Xue, N.; Dottorini, T.; Ambalkar, S.; Satav, A.; Polytarchou, C.; Acharjee, A.; Kashyap, R.S. Multiomics Profiling Reveals Signatures of Dysmetabolism in Urban Populations in Central India. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 1485. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071485

AMA Style

Monaghan TM, Biswas RN, Nashine RR, Joshi SS, Mullish BH, Seekatz AM, Blanco JM, McDonald JAK, Marchesi JR, Yau To, Christodoulou N, Hatziapostolou M, Pucic-Bakovic M, Vuckovic F, Klicek F, Lauc G, Xue N, Dottorini T, Ambalkar S, Satav A, Polytarchou C, Acharjee A, Kashyap RS. Multiomics Profiling Reveals Signatures of Dysmetabolism in Urban Populations in Central India. Microorganisms. 2021; 9(7):1485. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071485

Chicago/Turabian Style

Monaghan, Tanya M., Rima N. Biswas, Rupam R. Nashine, Samidha S. Joshi, Benjamin H. Mullish, Anna M. Seekatz, Jesus M. Blanco, Julie A.K. McDonald, Julian R. Marchesi, Tung o. Yau, Niki Christodoulou, Maria Hatziapostolou, Maja Pucic-Bakovic, Frano Vuckovic, Filip Klicek, Gordan Lauc, Ning Xue, Tania Dottorini, Shrikant Ambalkar, Ashish Satav, Christos Polytarchou, Animesh Acharjee, and Rajpal S. Kashyap. 2021. "Multiomics Profiling Reveals Signatures of Dysmetabolism in Urban Populations in Central India" Microorganisms 9, no. 7: 1485. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071485

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop