Next Article in Journal
The Composition and Diversity of the Gut Microbiota in Children Is Modifiable by the Household Dogs: Impact of a Canine-Specific Probiotic
Next Article in Special Issue
Implementing SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antigen Testing in the Emergency Ward of a Swiss University Hospital: The INCREASE Study
Previous Article in Journal
Young at Gut—Turning Back the Clock with the Gut Microbiome
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Comprehensive Review of Detection Methods for SARS-CoV-2
Comment published on 23 August 2021, see Microorganisms 2021, 9(8), 1786.
Communication

Persistence of Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies Depends on the Analytical Kit: A Report for Up to 10 Months after Infection

1
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinique St-Luc Bouge, 5004 Namur, Belgium
2
Department of Pharmacy, Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences, University of Namur, 5000 Namur, Belgium
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Clinique St-Luc Bouge, 5004 Namur, Belgium
4
Qualiblood s.a., 5000 Namur, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Oliver Schildgen
Microorganisms 2021, 9(3), 556; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9030556
Received: 7 February 2021 / Revised: 20 February 2021 / Accepted: 5 March 2021 / Published: 8 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19: Focusing on Epidemiologic, Virologic, and Clinical Studies)
Several studies have described the long-term kinetics of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies but long-term follow-up data, i.e., >6 months, are still sparse. Additionally, the literature is inconsistent regarding the waning effect of the serological response. The aim of this study was to explore the temporal dynamic changes of the immune response after SARS-CoV-2 infection in hospitalized and non-hospitalized symptomatic patients over a period of 10 months. Six different analytical kits for SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection were used. Positivity rates, inter-assay agreement and kinetic models were determined. A high inter-individual and an inter-methodology variability was observed. Assays targeting total antibodies presented higher positivity rates and reached the highest positivity rates sooner compared with assays directed against IgG. The inter-assay agreement was also higher between these assays. The stratification by disease severity showed a much-elevated serological response in hospitalized versus non-hospitalized patients in all assays. In this 10-month follow-up study, serological assays showed a clinically significant difference to detect past SARS-CoV-2 infection with total antibody assays presenting the highest positivity rates. The waning effect reported in several studies should be interpreted with caution because it could depend on the assay considered. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; antibody; kinetics; long-term; waning effect COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; antibody; kinetics; long-term; waning effect
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Favresse, J.; Eucher, C.; Elsen, M.; Gillot, C.; Van Eeckhoudt, S.; Dogné, J.-M.; Douxfils, J. Persistence of Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies Depends on the Analytical Kit: A Report for Up to 10 Months after Infection. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 556. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9030556

AMA Style

Favresse J, Eucher C, Elsen M, Gillot C, Van Eeckhoudt S, Dogné J-M, Douxfils J. Persistence of Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies Depends on the Analytical Kit: A Report for Up to 10 Months after Infection. Microorganisms. 2021; 9(3):556. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9030556

Chicago/Turabian Style

Favresse, Julien, Christine Eucher, Marc Elsen, Constant Gillot, Sandrine Van Eeckhoudt, Jean-Michel Dogné, and Jonathan Douxfils. 2021. "Persistence of Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies Depends on the Analytical Kit: A Report for Up to 10 Months after Infection" Microorganisms 9, no. 3: 556. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9030556

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop