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Article

Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Heterotrophic Protists (Cercozoa and Endomyxa) from Biological Soil Crusts

1
Institute for Biological Sciences, Applied Ecology and Phycology, University of Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Str. 3, 18059 Rostock, Germany
2
Institute of Zoology, Terrestrial Ecology, University of Cologne, Zülpicher Str. 47b, 50674 Cologne, Germany
3
Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Soil Science, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2021, 9(2), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9020205
Received: 13 December 2020 / Revised: 14 January 2021 / Accepted: 15 January 2021 / Published: 20 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Microbiology)
Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) accommodate diverse communities of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms. Heterotrophic protists have critical roles in the microbial food webs of soils, with Cercozoa and Endomyxa often being dominant groups. Still, the diversity, community composition, and functions of Cercozoa and Endomyxa in biocrusts have been little explored. In this study, using a high-throughput sequencing method with taxon-specific barcoded primers, we studied cercozoan and endomyxan communities in biocrusts from two unique habitats (subarctic grassland and temperate dunes). The communities differed strongly, with the grassland and dunes being dominated by Sarcomonadea (69%) and Thecofilosea (43%), respectively. Endomyxa and Phytomyxea were the minor components in dunes. Sandonidae, Allapsidae, and Rhogostomidae were the most abundant taxa in both habitats. In terms of functionality, up to 69% of the grassland community was constituted by bacterivorous Cercozoa. In contrast, cercozoan and endomyxan communities in dunes consisted of 31% bacterivores, 25% omnivores, and 20% eukaryvores. Facultative and obligate eukaryvores mostly belonged to the families Rhogostomidae, Fiscullidae, Euglyphidae, Leptophryidae, and Cercomonadidae, most of which are known to feed mainly on algae. Biocrust edaphic parameters such as pH, total organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus did not have any significant influence on shaping cercozoan communities within each habitat, which confirms previous results from dunes. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cercozoa; eukaryvory; feeding behavior; functional traits; soil food web Cercozoa; eukaryvory; feeding behavior; functional traits; soil food web
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MDPI and ACS Style

Khanipour Roshan, S.; Dumack, K.; Bonkowski, M.; Leinweber, P.; Karsten, U.; Glaser, K. Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Heterotrophic Protists (Cercozoa and Endomyxa) from Biological Soil Crusts. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 205. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9020205

AMA Style

Khanipour Roshan S, Dumack K, Bonkowski M, Leinweber P, Karsten U, Glaser K. Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Heterotrophic Protists (Cercozoa and Endomyxa) from Biological Soil Crusts. Microorganisms. 2021; 9(2):205. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9020205

Chicago/Turabian Style

Khanipour Roshan, Samira, Kenneth Dumack, Michael Bonkowski, Peter Leinweber, Ulf Karsten, and Karin Glaser. 2021. "Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Heterotrophic Protists (Cercozoa and Endomyxa) from Biological Soil Crusts" Microorganisms 9, no. 2: 205. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9020205

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