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Correction published on 8 December 2021, see Microorganisms 2021, 9(12), 2535.
Article

The Influence of Above-Ground Herbivory on the Response of Arctic Soil Methanotrophs to Increasing CH4 Concentrations and Temperatures

1
Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø, Norway
2
Institute of Environmental Sciences and Geography, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vitaly V. Kadnikov
Microorganisms 2021, 9(10), 2080; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9102080
Received: 27 August 2021 / Revised: 17 September 2021 / Accepted: 23 September 2021 / Published: 2 October 2021 / Corrected: 8 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Communities in Methane Cycle in Arctic Region)
Rising temperatures in the Arctic affect soil microorganisms, herbivores, and peatland vegetation, thus directly and indirectly influencing microbial CH4 production. It is not currently known how methanotrophs in Arctic peat respond to combined changes in temperature, CH4 concentration, and vegetation. We studied methanotroph responses to temperature and CH4 concentration in peat exposed to herbivory and protected by exclosures. The methanotroph activity was assessed by CH4 oxidation rate measurements using peat soil microcosms and a pure culture of Methylobacter tundripaludum SV96, qPCR, and sequencing of pmoA transcripts. Elevated CH4 concentrations led to higher CH4 oxidation rates both in grazed and exclosed peat soils, but the strongest response was observed in grazed peat soils. Furthermore, the relative transcriptional activities of different methanotroph community members were affected by the CH4 concentrations. While transcriptional responses to low CH4 concentrations were more prevalent in grazed peat soils, responses to high CH4 concentrations were more prevalent in exclosed peat soils. We observed no significant methanotroph responses to increasing temperatures. We conclude that methanotroph communities in these peat soils respond to changes in the CH4 concentration depending on their previous exposure to grazing. This “conditioning” influences which strains will thrive and, therefore, determines the function of the methanotroph community. View Full-Text
Keywords: methanotroph; methane oxidation; pmoA amplicon sequencing; Methylobacter; grazing pressure; peat soil microcosms; temperature; Arctic methanotroph; methane oxidation; pmoA amplicon sequencing; Methylobacter; grazing pressure; peat soil microcosms; temperature; Arctic
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rainer, E.M.; Seppey, C.V.W.; Hammer, C.; Svenning, M.M.; Tveit, A.T. The Influence of Above-Ground Herbivory on the Response of Arctic Soil Methanotrophs to Increasing CH4 Concentrations and Temperatures. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 2080. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9102080

AMA Style

Rainer EM, Seppey CVW, Hammer C, Svenning MM, Tveit AT. The Influence of Above-Ground Herbivory on the Response of Arctic Soil Methanotrophs to Increasing CH4 Concentrations and Temperatures. Microorganisms. 2021; 9(10):2080. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9102080

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rainer, Edda M., Christophe V.W. Seppey, Caroline Hammer, Mette M. Svenning, and Alexander T. Tveit. 2021. "The Influence of Above-Ground Herbivory on the Response of Arctic Soil Methanotrophs to Increasing CH4 Concentrations and Temperatures" Microorganisms 9, no. 10: 2080. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9102080

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