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Article

Degradation of Hydrocarbons and Heavy Metal Reduction by Marine Bacteria in Highly Contaminated Sediments

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Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Istituto Nazionale di Biologia, Ecologia e Biotecnologie Marine, Villa Comunale, 80121 Napoli, Italy
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Department of Biotechnology, Institute for Microbial Biotechnology and Metagenomics (IMBM), University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7535, Cape Town, South Africa
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Centre for Environmental Biotechnology (CEB), School of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Gwynedd LL57 2UW, UK
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Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e dell’Ambiente, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(9), 1402; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091402
Received: 17 July 2020 / Revised: 9 September 2020 / Accepted: 10 September 2020 / Published: 11 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Microbial Biotechnology)
Investigations on the ability of bacteria to enhance removal of hydrocarbons and reduce heavy metal toxicity in sediments are necessary to design more effective bioremediation strategies. In this study, five bacterial strains, Halomonas sp. SZN1, Alcanivorax sp. SZN2, Pseudoalteromonas sp. SZN3, Epibacterium sp. SZN4, and Virgibacillus sp. SZN7, were isolated from polluted sediments from an abandoned industrial site in the Gulf of Naples, Mediterranean Sea, and tested for their bioremediation efficiency on sediment samples collected from the same site. These bacteria were added as consortia or as individual cultures into polluted sediments to assess biodegradation efficiency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metal immobilisation capacity. Our results indicate that these bacteria were able to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, with a removal rate up to ca. 80% for dibenzo-anthracene. In addition, these bacteria reduced arsenic, lead, and cadmium mobility by promoting their partitioning into less mobile and bioavailable fractions. Microbial consortia generally showed higher performance toward pollutants as compared with pure isolates, suggesting potential synergistic interactions able to enhance bioremediation capacity. Overall, our findings suggest that highly polluted sediments select for bacteria efficient at reducing the toxicity of hazardous compounds, paving the way for scaled-up bioremediation trials. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioremediation; PAHs; heavy metals; bacteria; pollution; sediments bioremediation; PAHs; heavy metals; bacteria; pollution; sediments
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dell’Anno, F.; Brunet, C.; van Zyl, L.J.; Trindade, M.; Golyshin, P.N.; Dell’Anno, A.; Ianora, A.; Sansone, C. Degradation of Hydrocarbons and Heavy Metal Reduction by Marine Bacteria in Highly Contaminated Sediments. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1402. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091402

AMA Style

Dell’Anno F, Brunet C, van Zyl LJ, Trindade M, Golyshin PN, Dell’Anno A, Ianora A, Sansone C. Degradation of Hydrocarbons and Heavy Metal Reduction by Marine Bacteria in Highly Contaminated Sediments. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(9):1402. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091402

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dell’Anno, Filippo, Christophe Brunet, Leonardo J. van Zyl, Marla Trindade, Peter N. Golyshin, Antonio Dell’Anno, Adrianna Ianora, and Clementina Sansone. 2020. "Degradation of Hydrocarbons and Heavy Metal Reduction by Marine Bacteria in Highly Contaminated Sediments" Microorganisms 8, no. 9: 1402. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091402

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