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Open AccessArticle

Transferable Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL) Plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae from Irrigation Water

1
Microbiological Food Safety, Agroscope, 8820 Wädenswil, Switzerland
2
Microbiological Food Safety, Agroscope, 3003 Liebefeld, Switzerland
3
Institute for Epidemiology and Pathogen Diagnostics, Julius Kühn-Institut—Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants (JKI), 38104 Braunschweig, Germany
4
Department of Life Sciences, Albstadt-Sigmaringen University, 72488 Sigmaringen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(7), 978; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8070978
Received: 13 June 2020 / Revised: 26 June 2020 / Accepted: 28 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance: From the Environment to Human Health)
Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae are classified as serious threats to human health by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Water used for irrigation of fresh produce can transmit such resistant bacteria directly to edible plant parts. We screened ESBL-producing Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, and Citrobacter freundii isolated from irrigation water for their potential to transmit resistance to antibiotic-susceptible E. coli. All strains were genome-sequenced and tested in vitro for transmission of resistance to third-generation cephalosporins on solid agar as well as in liquid culture. Of the 19 screened isolates, five ESBL-producing E. coli were able to transfer resistance with different efficiency to susceptible recipient E. coli. Transconjugant strains were sequenced for detection of transferred antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and compared to the known ARG pattern of their respective donors. Additionally, phenotypic resistance patterns were obtained for both transconjugant and corresponding donor strains, confirming ESBL-producing phenotypes of all obtained transconjugants. View Full-Text
Keywords: irrigation water; antibiotic resistance; ESBL Enterobacteriaceae; conjugative plasmids irrigation water; antibiotic resistance; ESBL Enterobacteriaceae; conjugative plasmids
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gekenidis, M.-T.; Kläui, A.; Smalla, K.; Drissner, D. Transferable Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL) Plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae from Irrigation Water. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 978. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8070978

AMA Style

Gekenidis M-T, Kläui A, Smalla K, Drissner D. Transferable Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL) Plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae from Irrigation Water. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(7):978. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8070978

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gekenidis, Maria-Theresia; Kläui, Anita; Smalla, Kornelia; Drissner, David. 2020. "Transferable Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL) Plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae from Irrigation Water" Microorganisms 8, no. 7: 978. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8070978

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