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Open AccessArticle

Early Stage Root-Associated Fungi Show a High Temporal Turnover, but Are Independent of Beech Progeny

1
UFZ-Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Straße 4, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
2
Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, University of Goettingen, Büsgenweg 2, 37077 Göttingen, Germany
3
Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microbiology, State Key Laboratory of Mycology, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, China
4
UFZ-Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Community Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Straße 4, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
5
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5e, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(2), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8020210
Received: 27 November 2019 / Revised: 30 January 2020 / Accepted: 1 February 2020 / Published: 4 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Genomics of Forest Fungi and Their Interactions)
The relationship between trees and root-associated fungal communities is complex. By specific root deposits and other signal cues, different tree species are able to attract divergent sets of fungal species. Plant intraspecific differences can lead to variable fungal patterns in the root’s proximity. Therefore, within the Beech Transplant Experiment, we analyzed the impact of three different European beech ecotypes on the fungal communities in roots and the surrounding rhizosphere soil at two time points. Beech nuts were collected in three German sites in 2011. After one year, seedlings of the different progenies were out-planted on one site and eventually re-sampled in 2014 and 2017. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the fungal ITS2 to determine the correlation between tree progeny, a possible home-field advantage, plant development and root-associated fungal guilds under field conditions. Our result showed no effect of beech progeny on either fungal OTU richness or fungal community structure. However, over time the fungal OTU richness in roots increased and the fungal communities changed significantly, also in rhizosphere. In both plant compartments, the fungal communities displayed a high temporal turnover, indicating a permanent development and functional adaption of the root mycobiome of young beeches. View Full-Text
Keywords: Fagus sylvatica; rhizosphere; fungal ITS2; Illumina sequencing; Beech Transplant Experiment; Biodiversity Exploratories Fagus sylvatica; rhizosphere; fungal ITS2; Illumina sequencing; Beech Transplant Experiment; Biodiversity Exploratories
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Goldmann, K.; Ammerschubert, S.; Pena, R.; Polle, A.; Wu, B.-W.; Wubet, T.; Buscot, F. Early Stage Root-Associated Fungi Show a High Temporal Turnover, but Are Independent of Beech Progeny. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 210.

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