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Microorganisms 2019, 7(2), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020057

Rotations with Indian Mustard and Wild Rocket Suppressed Cucumber Fusarium Wilt Disease and Changed Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities

1
Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Improvement of Horticultural Crops (Northeast Region), Ministry of Agriculture, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, China
2
Department of Horticulture, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 January 2019 / Revised: 20 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 21 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Microbiology)
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Abstract

Crop monocropping usually results in an enrichment of soil-borne pathogens in soil. Crop rotation is an environmentally friendly method for controlling soil-borne diseases. Plant rhizosphere microorganisms, especially plant-beneficial microorganisms, play a major role in protecting plants from pathogens, but responses of these microorganisms to crop rotation remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the effects of rotations with Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and wild rocket (Diplotaxis tenuifolia (L.) DC.) on cucumber Fusarium wilt disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cucumerinum (FOC). Cucumber rhizosphere bacterial community composition was analyzed by high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (an antifungal secondary metabolite) producer and FOC abundances were estimated by real-time PCR. Rotations with Indian mustard and wild rocket suppressed cucumber Fusarium wilt disease and cucumber rhizosphere FOC abundance. Crop rotations increased cucumber rhizosphere bacteria, Pseudomonas spp. and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol producer abundances. Moreover, crop rotations changed cucumber rhizosphere bacterial community composition and increased bacterial community diversity. However, crop rotations decreased soil inorganic nitrogen content and inhibited cucumber seedling growth. Overall, rotations with Indian mustard and wild rocket suppressed cucumber Fusarium wilt disease, which might be linked to the increased rhizosphere bacterial diversity and abundances of potential plant-beneficial microorganisms (such as Pseudomonas spp. and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol producer). View Full-Text
Keywords: bacterial community composition; crop rotation; Cucumis sativus L.; fusarium wilt; Pseudomonas spp bacterial community composition; crop rotation; Cucumis sativus L.; fusarium wilt; Pseudomonas spp
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Jin, X.; Wang, J.; Li, D.; Wu, F.; Zhou, X. Rotations with Indian Mustard and Wild Rocket Suppressed Cucumber Fusarium Wilt Disease and Changed Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities. Microorganisms 2019, 7, 57.

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