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Open AccessArticle

Increasing Resistance and Changes in Distribution of Serotypes of Streptococcus agalactiae in Poland

1
Department of Genetics and Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Swiecickiego 4, 60-781 Poznan, Poland
2
Unit of Microbiology, Gynaecological and Obstetrical University Hospital, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Polna 33, 60-535 Poznan, Poland
3
Institute of Human Genetics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Strzeszynska 32, 60-479 Poznan, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pathogens 2020, 9(7), 526; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9070526
Received: 29 May 2020 / Revised: 25 June 2020 / Accepted: 26 June 2020 / Published: 29 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Human Pathogens)
Streptococcus agalactiae is responsible for serious infections in newborn babies, pregnant women, and other patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility, serotype distribution, and virulence determinants of the S. agalactiae isolates derived from clinical specimens considering the global increase of both antibiotic resistance and virulence. A total of 165 isolates were identified and serotyped by PCR techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility was assessed by disk diffusion method, gradient diffusion method and VITEK® System. Virulence associated genes were investigated by PCR; ability to form biofilm was assessed using a microtiter plate assay. The highest observed MIC value for penicillin G was 0.12 µg/mL, seen in 8.5% of isolates. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin were found in 30.38% and 24.8% of the strains, respectively. The serotype III (32.73%), V (25.45%), and Ia (18.18%) were found as the most frequently represented. Previously unidentified strains in Poland, belonging to serotypes VI (three strains) and VII (one strain) were recognized. The presence of genes encoding various virulence factors as well as diverse ability to form biofilm were found. In conclusion, macrolide-resistance and decreased susceptibility to penicillin G were revealed signifying the increasing resistance among group B streptococci. Moreover, the presence of genes encoding various virulence factors and the ability to form biofilm were confirmed indicating their role in the pathomechanisms of the evaluated GBS infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: group B Streptococcus; macrolide resistance; decreased susceptibility to penicillin G; GBS serotypes; virulence factors; biofilm group B Streptococcus; macrolide resistance; decreased susceptibility to penicillin G; GBS serotypes; virulence factors; biofilm
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Kaminska, D.; Ratajczak, M.; Szumała-Kąkol, A.; Dlugaszewska, J.; Nowak-Malczewska, D.M.; Gajecka, M. Increasing Resistance and Changes in Distribution of Serotypes of Streptococcus agalactiae in Poland. Pathogens 2020, 9, 526.

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