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Open AccessArticle

Identification of Transmission Routes of Campylobacter and On-Farm Measures to Reduce Campylobacter in Chicken

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7036, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
2
SLU Global Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P. O. Box 7023, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pathogens 2020, 9(5), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9050363
Received: 31 March 2020 / Revised: 21 April 2020 / Accepted: 6 May 2020 / Published: 9 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Campylobacter Infections)
An in-depth analysis was performed on Swedish broiler producers that had delivered chickens with Campylobacter to slaughter over several years, in order to identify possible transmission routes and formulate effective measures to prevent chickens being colonized with Campylobacter. Between 2017 and 2019, 626 samples were collected at farm level and Campylobacter was isolated from 133 (21.2%). All C. jejuni and C. coli isolated from these samples were whole-genome sequenced, together with isolates from the corresponding cecum samples at slaughter (n = 256). Core genome multi-locus sequence typing (cgMLST) analysis, using schemes consisting of 1140 and 529 genes for C. jejuni and C. coli, respectively, revealed that nearby cattle, contaminated drinking water, water ponds, transport crates, and parent flocks were potential reservoirs of Campylobacter. A novel feature compared with previous studies is that measures were implemented and tested during the work. These contributed to a nationwide decrease in Campylobacter-positive flocks from 15.4% in 2016 to 4.6% in 2019, which is the lowest ever rate in Sweden. To conclude, there are different sources and routes of Campylobacter transmission to chickens from different broiler producers, and individual measures must be taken by each producer to prevent Campylobacter colonization of chickens. View Full-Text
Keywords: broiler; Campylobacter coli; Campylobacter jejuni; campylobacteriosis; cgMLST; chicken; environmental sampling; on-farm measures; transmission routes; whole-genome sequencing broiler; Campylobacter coli; Campylobacter jejuni; campylobacteriosis; cgMLST; chicken; environmental sampling; on-farm measures; transmission routes; whole-genome sequencing
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Frosth, S.; Karlsson-Lindsjö, O.; Niazi, A.; Fernström, L.-L.; Hansson, I. Identification of Transmission Routes of Campylobacter and On-Farm Measures to Reduce Campylobacter in Chicken. Pathogens 2020, 9, 363.

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