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Open AccessArticle

Witch Hazel Significantly Improves the Efficacy of Commercially Available Teat Dips

1
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA 94710, USA
2
Department of Chemistry and Food Science, Framingham State University, Framingham, MA, USA
3
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Marche Polytechnic University, Ancona, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pathogens 2020, 9(2), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9020092
Received: 10 January 2020 / Revised: 27 January 2020 / Accepted: 28 January 2020 / Published: 1 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mastitis in Dairy Ruminants)
Bovine intramammary infections (IMIs) are the main cause of economic loss in milk production. Antibiotics are often ineffective in treating infections due to antimicrobial resistance and the formation of bacterial biofilms that enhance bacterial survival and persistence. Teat dips containing germicides are recommended to prevent new IMIs and improve udder health and milk quality. IMIs are often caused by staphylococci, which are Gram-positive bacteria that become pathogenic by forming biofilms and producing toxins. As a model for a teat dip (DIP), the BacStop iodine-based teat dip (DIP) was used. Witch hazel extract (whISOBAX (WH)) was tested because it contains a high concentration of the anti-biofilm/anti-toxin phenolic compound hamamelitannin. We found that the minimal inhibitory or bactericidal concentrations of DIP against planktonic S. epidermidis cells increased up to 160fold in the presence of WH, and that DIP was 10-fold less effective against biofilm cells. While both DIP and WH are effective in inhibiting the growth of S. aureus, only WH inhibits toxin production (tested for enterotoxin-A). Importantly, WH also significantly enhances the antibacterial effect of DIP against Gram-negative bacteria that can cause IMIs, like Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Put together, these results suggest that the antibacterial activity of DIP combined with WH is significantly higher, and thus have potential in eradicating bacterial infections, both in acute (planktonic-associated) and in chronic (biofilm-associated) conditions.
Keywords: mastitis; witch hazel extract; biofilm; staphylococcus; Escherichia coli; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; mastitis; witch hazel extract; biofilm; staphylococcus; Escherichia coli; Pseudomonas aeruginosa;
MDPI and ACS Style

Rasooly, R.; Molnar, A.; Do, P.; Morroni, G.; Brescini, L.; Cirioni, O.; Giacometti, A.; Apostolidis, E. Witch Hazel Significantly Improves the Efficacy of Commercially Available Teat Dips. Pathogens 2020, 9, 92.

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