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Review

Biofilm through the Looking Glass: A Microbial Food Safety Perspective

1
Department of Animal Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845, USA
2
Roman L. Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Clay Center, NE 68933, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Saeed Khan, Juhee Ahn and Kidon Sung
Pathogens 2022, 11(3), 346; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11030346
Received: 7 February 2022 / Revised: 8 March 2022 / Accepted: 10 March 2022 / Published: 12 March 2022
Food-processing facilities harbor a wide diversity of microorganisms that persist and interact in multispecies biofilms, which could provide an ecological niche for pathogens to better colonize and gain tolerance against sanitization. Biofilm formation by foodborne pathogens is a serious threat to food safety and public health. Biofilms are formed in an environment through synergistic interactions within the microbial community through mutual adaptive response to their long-term coexistence. Mixed-species biofilms are more tolerant to sanitizers than single-species biofilms or their planktonic equivalents. Hence, there is a need to explore how multispecies biofilms help in protecting the foodborne pathogen from common sanitizers and disseminate biofilm cells from hotspots and contaminate food products. This knowledge will help in designing microbial interventions to mitigate foodborne pathogens in the processing environment. As the global need for safe, high-quality, and nutritious food increases, it is vital to study foodborne pathogen behavior and engineer new interventions that safeguard food from contamination with pathogens. This review focuses on the potential food safety issues associated with biofilms in the food-processing environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: biofilm; microbial ecology; black queen hypothesis; adaptive response biofilm; microbial ecology; black queen hypothesis; adaptive response
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chitlapilly Dass, S.; Wang, R. Biofilm through the Looking Glass: A Microbial Food Safety Perspective. Pathogens 2022, 11, 346. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11030346

AMA Style

Chitlapilly Dass S, Wang R. Biofilm through the Looking Glass: A Microbial Food Safety Perspective. Pathogens. 2022; 11(3):346. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11030346

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chitlapilly Dass, Sapna, and Rong Wang. 2022. "Biofilm through the Looking Glass: A Microbial Food Safety Perspective" Pathogens 11, no. 3: 346. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11030346

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