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Article

Schistosomes Impede ATP-Induced T Cell Apoptosis In Vitro: The Role of Ectoenzyme SmNPP5

Molecular Helminthology Laboratory, Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.
Academic Editor: Hannah Wei Wu
Pathogens 2022, 11(2), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11020155
Received: 7 December 2021 / Revised: 18 January 2022 / Accepted: 22 January 2022 / Published: 26 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Schistosomiasis: Host-Pathogen Biology)
Schistosomes (blood flukes) can survive in the bloodstream of their hosts for many years. We hypothesize that proteins on their host-interactive surface impinge on host biochemistry to help ensure their long-term survival. Here, we focus on a surface ectoenzyme of Schistosoma mansoni, designated SmNPP5. This ~53 kDa glycoprotein is a nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase that has been previously shown to: (1) cleave adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and block platelet aggregation; and (2) cleave nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and block NAD-induced T cell apoptosis in vitro. T cell apoptosis can additionally be driven by extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP). In this work, we show that adult S. mansoni parasites can inhibit this process. Further, we demonstrate that recombinant SmNPP5 alone can both cleave ATP and impede ATP-induced T cell killing. As immunomodulatory regulatory T cells (Tregs) are especially prone to the induction of these apoptotic pathways, we hypothesize that the schistosome cleavage of both NAD and ATP promotes Treg survival and this helps to create a less immunologically hostile environment for the worms in vivo. View Full-Text
Keywords: Schistosoma; adenosine triphosphate; immunomodulation; Tregs; purinergic signaling Schistosoma; adenosine triphosphate; immunomodulation; Tregs; purinergic signaling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nation, C.S.; Da'dara, A.A.; Elzoheiry, M.; Skelly, P.J. Schistosomes Impede ATP-Induced T Cell Apoptosis In Vitro: The Role of Ectoenzyme SmNPP5. Pathogens 2022, 11, 155. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11020155

AMA Style

Nation CS, Da'dara AA, Elzoheiry M, Skelly PJ. Schistosomes Impede ATP-Induced T Cell Apoptosis In Vitro: The Role of Ectoenzyme SmNPP5. Pathogens. 2022; 11(2):155. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11020155

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nation, Catherine S., Akram A. Da'dara, Manal Elzoheiry, and Patrick J. Skelly. 2022. "Schistosomes Impede ATP-Induced T Cell Apoptosis In Vitro: The Role of Ectoenzyme SmNPP5" Pathogens 11, no. 2: 155. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11020155

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