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From Jekyll to Hyde: The Yeast–Hyphal Transition of Candida albicans

1
Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos, Singapore 138673, Singapore
2
National Dental Centre Singapore, National Dental Research Institute Singapore (NDRIS), 5 Second Hospital Ave, Singapore 168938, Singapore
3
Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 10 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Donato Gerin
Pathogens 2021, 10(7), 859; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10070859
Received: 14 June 2021 / Revised: 30 June 2021 / Accepted: 5 July 2021 / Published: 7 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Candida albicans: A Major Fungal Pathogen of Humans)
Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, accounting for 15% of nosocomial infections with an estimated attributable mortality of 47%. C. albicans is usually a benign member of the human microbiome in healthy people. Under constant exposure to highly dynamic environmental cues in diverse host niches, C. albicans has successfully evolved to adapt to both commensal and pathogenic lifestyles. The ability of C. albicans to undergo a reversible morphological transition from yeast to filamentous forms is a well-established virulent trait. Over the past few decades, a significant amount of research has been carried out to understand the underlying regulatory mechanisms, signaling pathways, and transcription factors that govern the C. albicans yeast-to-hyphal transition. This review will summarize our current understanding of well-elucidated signal transduction pathways that activate C. albicans hyphal morphogenesis in response to various environmental cues and the cell cycle machinery involved in the subsequent regulation and maintenance of hyphal morphogenesis. View Full-Text
Keywords: polymorphism; hyphal morphogenesis; hyphal activation; signal transduction pathways; cell cycle regulation polymorphism; hyphal morphogenesis; hyphal activation; signal transduction pathways; cell cycle regulation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chow, E.W.L.; Pang, L.M.; Wang, Y. From Jekyll to Hyde: The Yeast–Hyphal Transition of Candida albicans. Pathogens 2021, 10, 859. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10070859

AMA Style

Chow EWL, Pang LM, Wang Y. From Jekyll to Hyde: The Yeast–Hyphal Transition of Candida albicans. Pathogens. 2021; 10(7):859. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10070859

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chow, Eve W.L., Li M. Pang, and Yue Wang. 2021. "From Jekyll to Hyde: The Yeast–Hyphal Transition of Candida albicans" Pathogens 10, no. 7: 859. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10070859

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