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Open AccessReview

Role of Zoo-Housed Animals in the Ecology of Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens—A Review

1
Centre for Infectious Animal Diseases and Zoonoses, Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, Prague 6, 165 00 Suchdol, Czech Republic
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Department of Animal Science and Food Processing, Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, Prague 6, 165 00 Suchdol, Czech Republic
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Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Viničná 7, 2 128 00 Prague, Czech Republic
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Institute of Parasitology, Biology Centre, Czech Academy of Sciences, Branišovská 1160/31, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
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Faculty of Sciences, University of South Bohemia, Branišovská 1160/31, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Stefania Perrucci
Pathogens 2021, 10(2), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10020210
Received: 14 January 2021 / Revised: 11 February 2021 / Accepted: 13 February 2021 / Published: 16 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ticks and Tick-Borne Diseases―Pathogens, Parasites and People)
Ticks are ubiquitous ectoparasites, feeding on representatives of all classes of terrestrial vertebrates and transmitting numerous pathogens of high human and veterinary medical importance. Exotic animals kept in zoological gardens, ranches, wildlife parks or farms may play an important role in the ecology of ticks and tick-borne pathogens (TBPs), as they may serve as hosts for local tick species. Moreover, they can develop diseases of varying severity after being infected by TBPs, and theoretically, can thus serve as reservoirs, thereby further propagating TBPs in local ecosystems. The definite role of these animals in the tick–host-pathogen network remains poorly investigated. This review provides a summary of the information currently available regarding ticks and TBPs in connection to captive local and exotic wildlife, with an emphasis on zoo-housed species. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ixodidae; ectoparasites; tick-borne diseases; tick hosts; zoo animals; exotic species; wildlife parks Ixodidae; ectoparasites; tick-borne diseases; tick hosts; zoo animals; exotic species; wildlife parks
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hrnková, J.; Schneiderová, I.; Golovchenko, M.; Grubhoffer, L.; Rudenko, N.; Černý, J. Role of Zoo-Housed Animals in the Ecology of Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens—A Review. Pathogens 2021, 10, 210. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10020210

AMA Style

Hrnková J, Schneiderová I, Golovchenko M, Grubhoffer L, Rudenko N, Černý J. Role of Zoo-Housed Animals in the Ecology of Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens—A Review. Pathogens. 2021; 10(2):210. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10020210

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hrnková, Johana; Schneiderová, Irena; Golovchenko, Marina; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rudenko, Natalie; Černý, Jiří. 2021. "Role of Zoo-Housed Animals in the Ecology of Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens—A Review" Pathogens 10, no. 2: 210. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10020210

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