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Autophagy—A Story of Bacteria Interfering with the Host Cell Degradation Machinery

1
Department of Molecular Immunology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44801 Bochum, Germany
2
Institute for Infectiology, University of Münster, 48149 Münster, Germany
3
German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Associated Site University of Münster, 48149 Münster, Germany
4
Systems-Oriented Immunology & Inflammation Research, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany
5
Department 3.2 Biochemistry, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), 38116 Braunschweig, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pathogens 2021, 10(2), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10020110
Received: 16 December 2020 / Revised: 18 January 2021 / Accepted: 20 January 2021 / Published: 22 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Immunological Responses and Immune Defense Mechanisms)
Autophagy is a highly conserved and fundamental cellular process to maintain cellular homeostasis through recycling of defective organelles or proteins. In a response to intracellular pathogens, autophagy further acts as an innate immune response mechanism to eliminate pathogens. This review will discuss recent findings on autophagy as a reaction to intracellular pathogens, such as Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Staphylococcus aureus, and pathogenic Escherichia coli. Interestingly, while some of these bacteria have developed methods to use autophagy for their own benefit within the cell, others have developed fascinating mechanisms to evade recognition, to subvert the autophagic pathway, or to escape from autophagy. View Full-Text
Keywords: autophagy; xenophagy; pathogens; pattern recognition receptors; innate immune response autophagy; xenophagy; pathogens; pattern recognition receptors; innate immune response
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MDPI and ACS Style

Riebisch, A.K.; Mühlen, S.; Beer, Y.Y.; Schmitz, I. Autophagy—A Story of Bacteria Interfering with the Host Cell Degradation Machinery. Pathogens 2021, 10, 110. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10020110

AMA Style

Riebisch AK, Mühlen S, Beer YY, Schmitz I. Autophagy—A Story of Bacteria Interfering with the Host Cell Degradation Machinery. Pathogens. 2021; 10(2):110. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10020110

Chicago/Turabian Style

Riebisch, Anna K.; Mühlen, Sabrina; Beer, Yan Y.; Schmitz, Ingo. 2021. "Autophagy—A Story of Bacteria Interfering with the Host Cell Degradation Machinery" Pathogens 10, no. 2: 110. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10020110

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