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Lincoln in the Bardo: “Uh, NOT a Historical Novel”

Department of English, University of North Carolina at Asheville, Asheville, NC 28804, USA
Humanities 2019, 8(2), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/h8020096
Received: 2 April 2019 / Revised: 26 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 May 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploring Contemporary Historical Fiction)
While George Saunders’s Lincoln in the Bardo (2017) has many of the characteristics of the traditional historical novel—lapse of time, incorporation of historical characters, focus on important world-historical events and conditions—it intriguingly challenges the boundaries of the genre by an unsettling approach to verisimilitude. In addition, its fragmentation and an unusual approach to narrative help to qualify it as a neo-historical novel. The author’s thoughts on historical fiction help to clarify its positioning. View Full-Text
Keywords: neo-historical; meta-historical; verisimilitude; George Saunders; Abraham Lincoln; Bardo neo-historical; meta-historical; verisimilitude; George Saunders; Abraham Lincoln; Bardo
MDPI and ACS Style

Moseley, M. Lincoln in the Bardo: “Uh, NOT a Historical Novel”. Humanities 2019, 8, 96.

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