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Open AccessArticle

Identity, Power, and the California Welfare-Rights Struggle, 1963–1975

Program in American Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
Academic Editor: Annabel Martín
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020014
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 15 March 2017 / Accepted: 29 March 2017 / Published: 2 April 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
This article explores the work of welfare-rights activists in 1960s and 70s California. These activists were mostly working-class black and some white mothers, and the majority of them were themselves welfare recipients. As welfare recipients, women of color, and working-class people, they faced a wave of policies and ideologies that stigmatized them, policed their behavior, and made receiving benefits increasingly difficult. These policies were but one element of a larger political crisis, wherein the California government stoked racialized and gendered fears in order to shrink the welfare state. Rather than simply acquiesce to this reality, welfare-rights groups in California refused to accept it. Though scholars have studied welfare-rights groups in Washington, D.C., Nevada, New York, and other US states, almost no attention has been given to groups in California. In this article I use state legislation, newspaper articles, organizational records, and archived interviews to illustrate how California’s welfare-rights movement challenged anti-welfare policy and ideology. I argue that they did more than simply reject punitive legislation. They emphasized childcare, rebuked middle-class complacency, questioned the primacy of the nuclear family, and dismissed gender roles. In the process, they raised crucial, enduring questions about the nature of economic-justice organizing. View Full-Text
Keywords: race; feminism; welfare reform; Reaganism; organizing race; feminism; welfare reform; Reaganism; organizing
MDPI and ACS Style

Puglisi, A. Identity, Power, and the California Welfare-Rights Struggle, 1963–1975. Humanities 2017, 6, 14.

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