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Article

“And in That Moment I Leapt upon His Shoulder”: Non-Human Intradiegetic Narrators in The Wind on the Moon

School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Box 883, 721 23 Västerås, Sweden
Academic Editor: Joela Jacobs
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020013
Received: 9 January 2017 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 26 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Narratology)
Non-human narrators, by definition anthropomorphized, fill different functions in literature, and have different effects, not always positive for the species that is utilized, for example to voice a human political concern. However, many animal studies scholars agree that anthropomorphism, while inadequate, may be the best way we have to get to know another species. Animal characters who tell their own, autobiographical, stories are particularly interesting in this regard. Eric Linklater’s children’s novel The Wind on the Moon (1944), raises posthumanist questions about human–animal differences, similarities and language, especially through its engagement of several non-human intradiegetic narrators. In a novel with surprisingly few other forms of characterization of the non-human characters, their own detailed narratives become a highly significant means of access to their species characteristics, their consciousness, and their needs. In an analysis of these embedded narratives using Genette’s theory of narrative levels and functions, as well as intersections of speech act theory and cognitive narratology, this article exposes an otherwise inaccessible dimension of characterization in Linklater’s novel. It argues that the embedded narratives, in contrast to crude anthropomorphism, are in fact what enables both a verbalization of the character narrators’ otherness, and a connection and comprehension between species. In other words, these non-human narratives constitute what might be called (with Garrard) examples of critical anthropomorphism. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-human narrators; intradiegetic narration; Gerard Genette; anthropomorphism; Eric Linklater; The Wind on the Moon; direct speech; characterization; posthumanism; inter-species comprehension non-human narrators; intradiegetic narration; Gerard Genette; anthropomorphism; Eric Linklater; The Wind on the Moon; direct speech; characterization; posthumanism; inter-species comprehension
MDPI and ACS Style

Danielsson, K.M. “And in That Moment I Leapt upon His Shoulder”: Non-Human Intradiegetic Narrators in The Wind on the Moon. Humanities 2017, 6, 13. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020013

AMA Style

Danielsson KM. “And in That Moment I Leapt upon His Shoulder”: Non-Human Intradiegetic Narrators in The Wind on the Moon. Humanities. 2017; 6(2):13. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020013

Chicago/Turabian Style

Danielsson, Karin Molander. 2017. "“And in That Moment I Leapt upon His Shoulder”: Non-Human Intradiegetic Narrators in The Wind on the Moon" Humanities 6, no. 2: 13. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020013

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