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Article

“I Do, I Don’t”: The Benefits and Perils of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage in the United States—One Year Later

1
Master of Health Care Delivery Science at Dartmouth, 37 Dewey Field Road, Hanover, NH 03755-7253, USA
2
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Research, 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03766, USA
3
Department of Public Health, School of Nursing and Health Professions, McKean 380, Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH 03257, USA
Academic Editors: Annabel Martín and Gail Finney
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020012
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
In 1970, a gay male couple applied for and was given a marriage license in Minnesota. The license was eventually rescinded by court order. Forty-five years later, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, limiting the federal definition of marriage to consist of one man and one woman, was unconstitutional. The result was the legalization of same-sex marriage in the United States. The purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of establishing the right for same-sex couples to legally marry. It outlines the benefits and costs to LGBT communities one year after the establishment of same-sex marriage in the U.S. This paper explores the limits of utilizing a rights-based approach when advocating social change. The recommendation is for LGBT individuals, communities and allies to shift tactics to adopt a capabilities approach to organizing and mobilizing people, groups, and organizations around issues of injustice. A capabilities framework addresses the complexities of individual and community needs while providing a foundation for coalition building and lasting positive social change. View Full-Text
Keywords: same-sex marriage; LGBT marriage; social movement; social change; gay marriage same-sex marriage; LGBT marriage; social movement; social change; gay marriage
MDPI and ACS Style

Wolff, K.B. “I Do, I Don’t”: The Benefits and Perils of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage in the United States—One Year Later. Humanities 2017, 6, 12. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020012

AMA Style

Wolff KB. “I Do, I Don’t”: The Benefits and Perils of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage in the United States—One Year Later. Humanities. 2017; 6(2):12. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020012

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wolff, Kristina B. 2017. "“I Do, I Don’t”: The Benefits and Perils of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage in the United States—One Year Later" Humanities 6, no. 2: 12. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020012

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