Next Article in Journal
Refugees and Representation: An Impossible Necessity
Previous Article in Journal
Transhumanities as the Pinnacle and a Bridge
Previous Article in Special Issue
Unshackling the Body, Mind, and Spirit: Reflections on Liberation and Creative Exchange between San Quentin and Auckland Prisons
Article

Performance as Intersectional Resistance: Power, Polyphony and Processes of Abolition

1
Department of Philosophy, The University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
2
School of the Arts and Media, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia
3
Marrugeku, Broome 6725, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Humanities 2022, 11(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/h11010028
Received: 4 August 2021 / Revised: 5 November 2021 / Accepted: 8 November 2021 / Published: 17 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acts of Liberation)
Australia’s brutal carceral-border regime is a colonial system of intertwining systems of oppression that combine the prison-industrial complex and the border-industrial complex. It is a violent and multidimensional regime that includes an expanding prison industry and onshore and offshore immigration detention centres; locations of cruelty, and violent sites for staging contemporary politics and coloniality. This article shares insights into the making of a radical intersectional dance theatre work titled Jurrungu Ngan-ga by Marrugeku, Australia’s leading Indigenous and intercultural dance theatre company. The production, created between 2019–2021, brings together collaborations through and across Indigenous Australian, Kurdish, Iranian, Palestinian, Filipino, Filipinx, and Anglo settler performance, activism and knowledge production. The artistic, political and intellectual dimensions of the show reinforce each other to interrogate Australia’s brutal carceral regime and the concept of the border itself. The article is presented in a polyphonic structure of expanded interviews with the cast and descriptions of the resulting live performance. It identifies radical ways that intersectional and trans-disciplinary performances can, as an ‘act of liberation’, be applied to make visible, embody, address, and help dismantle systems of oppression, control and subjugation. View Full-Text
Keywords: intersectional; performance; contemporary dance; borders; incarceration; abolition; Marrugeku intersectional; performance; contemporary dance; borders; incarceration; abolition; Marrugeku
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tofighian, O.; Swain, R.; Pigram, D.; Ra, B.; Connell, C.; Brown, E.J.; Shaheen, F.; Assaad, I.E.; Currie-Richardson, L.; Wheen, M.; Bero, C.; Lopez, Z. Performance as Intersectional Resistance: Power, Polyphony and Processes of Abolition. Humanities 2022, 11, 28. https://doi.org/10.3390/h11010028

AMA Style

Tofighian O, Swain R, Pigram D, Ra B, Connell C, Brown EJ, Shaheen F, Assaad IE, Currie-Richardson L, Wheen M, Bero C, Lopez Z. Performance as Intersectional Resistance: Power, Polyphony and Processes of Abolition. Humanities. 2022; 11(1):28. https://doi.org/10.3390/h11010028

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tofighian, Omid, Rachael Swain, Dalisa Pigram, Bhenji Ra, Chandler Connell, Emmanuel J. Brown, Feras Shaheen, Issa E. Assaad, Luke Currie-Richardson, Miranda Wheen, Czack Bero, and Zachary Lopez. 2022. "Performance as Intersectional Resistance: Power, Polyphony and Processes of Abolition" Humanities 11, no. 1: 28. https://doi.org/10.3390/h11010028

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop