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Open AccessArticle

Leaving a Violent Child Marriage: Experiences of Adult Survivors in Uganda

1
Department of Social Work and Social Administration, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda
2
Department of Behavioural and Social Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(10), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9100172
Received: 30 July 2020 / Revised: 21 September 2020 / Accepted: 27 September 2020 / Published: 29 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leaving a Violent Relationship)
Violence against women and girls remains a major public health threat the world over. A significant amount of violence experienced by women is perpetrated by their intimate partners. Moreover, the risk of experiencing intimate partner violence is amplified for women and girls who get married before turning 18. However, there is little documented information on how they escape such violent relationships. This article provides insight into the factors that help survivors of child marriage to leave violent relationships. It is based on in-depth interviews with 26 Ugandan women who married before they were 18. Four main factors helped child marriage survivors to leave violent unions: (1) having a secure base to return to; (2) reaching a tipping point in the relationship; (3) financial independence; and (4) intervention of a significant other. The significance of some factors varied with the age of the survivor at the point of leaving. It is concluded that parental support is a key facilitative factor for leaving violent relationships in the context of child marriage within a low resource setting. Interventions to promote positive parenting may significantly contribute to minimising the proportions of girls trapped in violent unions and incidences of child marriage in the long run. View Full-Text
Keywords: child marriage; girls; intimate partner violence; leaving violent relationships; survivor; Uganda; women child marriage; girls; intimate partner violence; leaving violent relationships; survivor; Uganda; women
MDPI and ACS Style

Nanfuka, E.; Turyomurugyendo, F.; Ochen, E.; Gibbs, G. Leaving a Violent Child Marriage: Experiences of Adult Survivors in Uganda. Soc. Sci. 2020, 9, 172.

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