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Article

Gender Inequity during the Ph.D.: Females in the Life Sciences Benefit Less from Their Integration into the Scientific Community

1
Institut für Didaktik und Ausbildungsforschung in der Medizin, Klinikum der Universität München, Ziemssenstr. 1, 80336 München, Germany
2
Prorektorat für Studium und Lehre, Universität zu Köln, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, 50923 Köln, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(8), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7080140
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 10 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Male-Dominated Domains)
Female researchers remain underrepresented in higher academic ranks, even within female-dominated fields, such as the life sciences. The phenomenon is often attributed to women’s lower publication productivity. The current article explores gender differences with respect to integration into the scientific community, pursued tasks during the Ph.D. (e.g., teaching and research), and publication productivity in the life sciences. Moreover, it explores how these variables relate to the intention of pursuing an academic research career. Survey data with recent Ph.D. graduates from the life sciences in Germany (N = 736) were analyzed through descriptive and multivariate analysis. Females had fewer publications as lead author (1.4 vs. 1.9, p = 0.05). There were no differences in pursued tasks, perceived integration into the scientific community, and co-authorship. However, Ph.D. characteristics affected females and males differently. Only male Ph.D. graduates benefited from being integrated into their scientific community by an increase in lead author publications. In contrast to male Ph.D. graduates, women’s academic career intentions were significantly affected by their integration into the scientific community and co-authorship. Results suggest that women may benefit less from their integration into the scientific community and may ascribe more importance to networks for their career progress. View Full-Text
Keywords: publication productivity; academic career; gender gap; Ph.D. education; life sciences; scientific community integration publication productivity; academic career; gender gap; Ph.D. education; life sciences; scientific community integration
MDPI and ACS Style

Epstein, N.; Lachmann, D. Gender Inequity during the Ph.D.: Females in the Life Sciences Benefit Less from Their Integration into the Scientific Community. Soc. Sci. 2018, 7, 140. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7080140

AMA Style

Epstein N, Lachmann D. Gender Inequity during the Ph.D.: Females in the Life Sciences Benefit Less from Their Integration into the Scientific Community. Social Sciences. 2018; 7(8):140. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7080140

Chicago/Turabian Style

Epstein, Nurith, and Daniel Lachmann. 2018. "Gender Inequity during the Ph.D.: Females in the Life Sciences Benefit Less from Their Integration into the Scientific Community" Social Sciences 7, no. 8: 140. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7080140

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