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Collective Identity, Organization, and Public Reaction in Protests: A Qualitative Case Study of Hong Kong and Taiwan

Department of Sociology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 2J4, Canada
Soc. Sci. 2017, 6(4), 150; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci6040150
Received: 24 August 2017 / Revised: 6 December 2017 / Accepted: 14 December 2017 / Published: 15 December 2017
Mainstream structuralist and new social movement theoretical approaches to studying social movements in Western sociological traditions fail to explain why the Sunflower movement fostered solidarity among the Taiwanese while Occupy Central caused public division in Hong Kong. In response, I argue that the successes and failures of both were a function of the consolidation and division of collective identity. Using a qualitative case study, this article analyzes the discursive constructions of collective identity as they intersect with protest spaces, drawing out the events in their protest cycles and identifying the mechanisms within them that constructed and deconstructed collective identity. In doing so, I illustrate three phases of collective identity construction: the creation of collective claims, recruitment strategies, and expressive decision-making. Ultimately, this explicates the movements’ differing outcomes, and how their decline both narrowed and broadened identity in ways that provide a repertoire of ideological narratives usable as recruitment strategies in future mobilizations. View Full-Text
Keywords: social movements; collective identity; solidarity; recruitment; Chinese societies; political sociology social movements; collective identity; solidarity; recruitment; Chinese societies; political sociology
MDPI and ACS Style

Au, A. Collective Identity, Organization, and Public Reaction in Protests: A Qualitative Case Study of Hong Kong and Taiwan. Soc. Sci. 2017, 6, 150.

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