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Article

Meeting in the Middle: TVET Programs’ Education–Employment Linkage at Different Stages of Development

1
Chair of Education Systems, Department of Management, Technology and Economics, ETH Zürich, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland
2
Chair of Applied Econometrics, Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Basel, 4002 Basel, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Queralt Capsada-Munsech
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(6), 220; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060220
Received: 4 May 2021 / Revised: 1 June 2021 / Accepted: 3 June 2021 / Published: 9 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Economic Implications of Skill and Educational Mismatch)
Technical and vocational education and training (TVET) programs are most successful at supporting youth labor markets when they combine education and employment. Education–employment linkage theory describes this combination in terms of power-sharing between actors from the education system and their counterparts in the employment system over key processes in the curriculum value chain of curriculum design, curriculum application (program delivery), and curriculum updating. The Education–Employment Linkage Index measures linkage for every function in a TVET program where actors from the two systems interact, aggregating those into processes and phases and eventually an index score. We apply this index to the largest upper-secondary TVET programs in Benin, Chile, Costa Rica, and Nepal. We find that Benin has relatively high education–employment linkage, while the other three countries score very low. Benin’s situation is unique because its TVET program is moving from employer-led to linked, rather than the typical employer integration into an education-based program. Other countries with large informal economies, low formal education and training rates, and existing non-formal employer-led training may be able to implement similar approaches. View Full-Text
Keywords: vocational education and training; VET; TVET; education–employment linkage; development vocational education and training; VET; TVET; education–employment linkage; development
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MDPI and ACS Style

Caves, K.M.; Ghisletta, A.; Kemper, J.M.; McDonald, P.; Renold, U. Meeting in the Middle: TVET Programs’ Education–Employment Linkage at Different Stages of Development. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 220. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060220

AMA Style

Caves KM, Ghisletta A, Kemper JM, McDonald P, Renold U. Meeting in the Middle: TVET Programs’ Education–Employment Linkage at Different Stages of Development. Social Sciences. 2021; 10(6):220. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060220

Chicago/Turabian Style

Caves, Katherine M., Andrea Ghisletta, Johanna M. Kemper, Patrick McDonald, and Ursula Renold. 2021. "Meeting in the Middle: TVET Programs’ Education–Employment Linkage at Different Stages of Development" Social Sciences 10, no. 6: 220. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060220

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