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Article

Guilty When Innocent. Australian Government’s Resistance to Bringing Home Wives and Children of Islamic State Fighters

1
School of Social Sciences, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
2
Western Sydney Migrant Resource Centre, Liverpool, NSW 2170, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Linda Briskman and Lucy Fiske
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(6), 202; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060202
Received: 30 March 2021 / Revised: 23 May 2021 / Accepted: 24 May 2021 / Published: 31 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Rights and Displaced People in Exceptional Times)
Currently there are 20 Australian women and 47 children being held in the Al-Roj camp in Northern Syria, who are the family members of Islamic State fighters. The Australian government argues that it is both unsafe for government officials to rescue those held in the camp and unsafe for Australia to repatriate these women and children. This security rhetoric is commonly understood as Australia’s abandonment of its citizens and their entitlements to protection and repatriation. This paper argues that the Australian government is condemning its citizens to a condition of statelessness and displacement, simulating the following conditions under which refugees and asylum seekers are forced to live: murder, violence, deprivation of adequate food and shelter, disease, and the potential hazards of the COVID-19 infection. Rendering its citizens to a condition of statelessness and displacement constitutes both punishment meted out on those deemed guilty by their presence in Syria, and provides the Australian government the opportunity to revoke the citizenship of women and children. Three Australian women who travelled to Syria have already been stripped of their Australian citizenship. This paper explores the conditions and methods by which the Australian government has erased the entitlements, protections and certainty of citizenship for Australian Muslim women and children. View Full-Text
Keywords: Muslim women; citizenship rights; security; Syria; Al-Hawl camp; Islamic State; Australian government; terrorism; criminalization; repatriation Muslim women; citizenship rights; security; Syria; Al-Hawl camp; Islamic State; Australian government; terrorism; criminalization; repatriation
MDPI and ACS Style

El-Matrah, J.; Dabboussy, K. Guilty When Innocent. Australian Government’s Resistance to Bringing Home Wives and Children of Islamic State Fighters. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 202. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060202

AMA Style

El-Matrah J, Dabboussy K. Guilty When Innocent. Australian Government’s Resistance to Bringing Home Wives and Children of Islamic State Fighters. Social Sciences. 2021; 10(6):202. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060202

Chicago/Turabian Style

El-Matrah, Joumanah, and Kamalle Dabboussy. 2021. "Guilty When Innocent. Australian Government’s Resistance to Bringing Home Wives and Children of Islamic State Fighters" Social Sciences 10, no. 6: 202. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060202

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