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Article

Violence, Terrorism, and Identity Politics in Afghanistan: The Securitisation of Higher Education

1
International Centre for Policing and Security, University of South Wales, Pontypridd CF37 4BD, UK
2
Centre of Excellence in Terrorism, Resilience, Intelligence and Organised Crime Research [CENTRIC], Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Andreas Pickel
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(5), 150; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10050150
Received: 5 March 2021 / Revised: 7 April 2021 / Accepted: 16 April 2021 / Published: 25 April 2021
This article investigates the securitisation of the higher education sector in Afghanistan by examining ‘hidden’ non-discursive practices as opposed to overt discursive threat construction. Non-discursive practices are framed by the habitus inherited from different social fields, whereas in Afghanistan, securitising actors converge from different habitus (e.g., institutions, professions, backgrounds) to bar the ‘other’ ethnic or social groups from resources and spaces which could empower these groups to become a pertinent threat, a fear, and a danger to the monopoly of the state elites over the state power and resources. The most prominent securitisation practices emerging from the data include mainly (1) the obstruction of the formation of critical ideas and politics; (2) the obstruction of economic opportunities; and (3) the obstruction of social justice. This article deploys a case study methodology and uses the Kabul University as its subject of investigation. View Full-Text
Keywords: Afghanistan; securitisation; violence; higher education; identity politics; statebuilding Afghanistan; securitisation; violence; higher education; identity politics; statebuilding
MDPI and ACS Style

Kaunert, C.; Sahar, A. Violence, Terrorism, and Identity Politics in Afghanistan: The Securitisation of Higher Education. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 150. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10050150

AMA Style

Kaunert C, Sahar A. Violence, Terrorism, and Identity Politics in Afghanistan: The Securitisation of Higher Education. Social Sciences. 2021; 10(5):150. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10050150

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kaunert, Christian, and Arif Sahar. 2021. "Violence, Terrorism, and Identity Politics in Afghanistan: The Securitisation of Higher Education" Social Sciences 10, no. 5: 150. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10050150

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