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Long Term Outcomes of Blended CBT Compared to Face-to-Face CBT and Treatment as Usual for Adolescents with Depressive Disorders: Analyses at 12 Months Post-Treatment

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Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, GGZ Oost Brabant, P.O. Box 3, 5427 ZG Boekel, The Netherlands
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Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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Clinical Child and Family Studies, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80140, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands
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Trimbos Institute, P.O. Box 725, 3500 AS Utrecht, The Netherlands
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Child and Youth Psychiatry, Altrecht GGZ, P.O. Box 85314, 3508 AH Utrecht, The Netherlands
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Eduardo Bunge, Blanca Pineda, Taylor N. Stephens and Naira Topooco
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(10), 373; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100373
Received: 16 June 2021 / Revised: 21 September 2021 / Accepted: 22 September 2021 / Published: 2 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technological Approaches for the Treatment of Mental Health in Youth)
Depression is a major problem in youth mental health and identified as the leading cause of disability worldwide. There is ample research on the acute effects of treatment, with estimated small-to-moderate effect sizes. However, there is a lack of research on long-term outcomes. A total of 129 adolescents with clinical depression (82.2% female), aged 13–22 (M = 16.60, SD = 2.03), received blended CBT, face-to-face CBT or treatment as usual. Data were collected at 12 months after the intervention and compared between treatment conditions. Clinical diagnosis, depressive symptoms, suicide risk, internalizing symptoms and externalizing symptoms decreased significantly over time, from baseline to the 12-month follow-up, and also from post-treatment to the 12-month follow-up in all three conditions. Changes were not significantly different between conditions. At the long-term, improvements following the treatment continued. Due to the large amount of missing data and use of history control condition, our findings need to be interpreted with caution. However, we consider these findings as a clinical imperative. More evidence might contribute to convincing adolescents to start with therapy, knowing it has lasting effects. Further, especially for adolescents for whom it is not possible to receive face-to-face treatment, blended treatment might be a valuable alternative. Our findings might contribute to the implementation of blended CBT. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescents; depression; treatment; blended; CBT; 12-month follow-up adolescents; depression; treatment; blended; CBT; 12-month follow-up
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rasing, S.P.A.; Stikkelbroek, Y.A.J.; den Hollander, W.; Okorn, A.; Bodden, D.H.M. Long Term Outcomes of Blended CBT Compared to Face-to-Face CBT and Treatment as Usual for Adolescents with Depressive Disorders: Analyses at 12 Months Post-Treatment. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 373. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100373

AMA Style

Rasing SPA, Stikkelbroek YAJ, den Hollander W, Okorn A, Bodden DHM. Long Term Outcomes of Blended CBT Compared to Face-to-Face CBT and Treatment as Usual for Adolescents with Depressive Disorders: Analyses at 12 Months Post-Treatment. Social Sciences. 2021; 10(10):373. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100373

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rasing, Sanne P.A., Yvonne A.J. Stikkelbroek, Wouter den Hollander, Ana Okorn, and Denise H.M. Bodden. 2021. "Long Term Outcomes of Blended CBT Compared to Face-to-Face CBT and Treatment as Usual for Adolescents with Depressive Disorders: Analyses at 12 Months Post-Treatment" Social Sciences 10, no. 10: 373. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100373

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