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Open AccessArticle

Seeing the Dog: Naturalistic Canine Representations from Greek Art

Department of Classics, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
Received: 13 November 2019 / Revised: 9 January 2020 / Accepted: 10 January 2020 / Published: 30 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animals in Ancient Material Cultures (vol. 1))
This study attempts to demonstrate that ancient Greek authors and vase painters (mostly of the late sixth and early fifth centuries) were well attuned to the many bodily gestures and positions exhibited by dogs in real life and utilized this knowledge in producing their works. Once this is clear, it becomes evident that the Greek public at large was equally aware of such canine bodily gestures and positions. This extends the seminal work on gestures of Boegehold and Lateiner to the animal world and seeks also to serve as a call for further study of similar animals throughout ancient Greek times.
Keywords: animal studies; dogs in antiquity; animals in antiquity; Greek vases; body language animal studies; dogs in antiquity; animals in antiquity; Greek vases; body language
MDPI and ACS Style

Kitchell, K.F. Seeing the Dog: Naturalistic Canine Representations from Greek Art. Arts 2020, 9, 14.

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