Next Article in Journal
The Journal Block and Its Art School Context
Next Article in Special Issue
Paimio Sanatorium under Construction
Previous Article in Journal
Aesthetics and Clarity in Information Visualization: The Designer’s Perspective
Previous Article in Special Issue
From Reception to Invention: The Arrival of Concrete to Iceland and the Rhetoric of Guðmundur Hannesson
Article Menu
Issue 4 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

“Utopias Are for Those Who Cannot Build”: The Structural Philosophy of the Swedish National Board of Building

Architecture and Civil Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Göteborg, Sweden
Received: 25 September 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 1 November 2018 / Published: 2 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technological Progress as a Basis for Modern Architecture)
Full-Text   |   PDF [5464 KB, uploaded 19 November 2018]   |  

Abstract

Structuralism in architecture was a widespread international phenomenon in the post-war decades. It was an avant-garde architecture, in many cases even utopian. In contrast to this, the structural philosophy of the Swedish National Board of Building was outspokenly pragmatic. This article, based on documents and interviews with the architects involved, gives the background of the National Board’s interest in “the chronological dimension of architecture”. The National Board was the largest client in Sweden for design and building and experienced managers of a large building stock. In the mid-1960s, they developed, in cooperation with consultants, a “building box” for office buildings. They gladly showed a lack of interest or downright scepticism towards international structuralism: “Utopias are for those who cannot build”. Two of the main involved practices were A4 and ELLT, later merged into Coordinator architects, and from early on focused on an architecture of change. Two of their iconic projects from the late 1960s are the large office block Garnisonen and IBM Nordic Education Center. They are examples of a “consequence architecture”, very clearly “ideas based”. For a period around 1970 the pragmatic theory led to radical projects. “Dogmatic theorising was part of the game” as it was said about contemporary art. View Full-Text
Keywords: architecture; structuralism; the Swedish National Board of Building; A4 architects; ELLT architects; coordinator architects architecture; structuralism; the Swedish National Board of Building; A4 architects; ELLT architects; coordinator architects
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Caldenby, C. “Utopias Are for Those Who Cannot Build”: The Structural Philosophy of the Swedish National Board of Building. Arts 2018, 7, 73.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Arts EISSN 2076-0752 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top