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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Feasibility Study of Mass-Timber Cores for the UBC Tall Wood Building

Wood Engineering, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada
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Buildings 2018, 8(8), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8080098
Received: 28 June 2018 / Revised: 25 July 2018 / Accepted: 25 July 2018 / Published: 1 August 2018
The UBC Brock Commons building in Vancouver, which comprises of 18 stories and stands 53 m in height, was at the time of completion in 2016 the world’s tallest hybrid wood-based building. The building’s 17 stories of mass-timber superstructure, carrying all gravity loads, rest on a concrete podium with two concrete cores that act as both the wind and seismic lateral load-resisting systems. Whereas the construction of the concrete cores took fourteen weeks in time, the mass-timber superstructure took only ten weeks from initiation to completion. A substantial reduction in the project timeline could have been achieved if mass-timber had been used for the cores, leading to a further reduction of the building’s environmental footprint and potential cost savings. The objective of this research was to evaluate the possibility of designing the UBC Brock Commons building using mass-timber cores. The results from a validated numerical structural model indicate that applying a series of structural adjustments, that is, configuration and thickness of cores, solutions with mass-timber cores can meet the seismic and wind performance criteria as per the current National Building Code of Canada. Specifically, the findings suggest the adoption of laminated-veneer lumber cores with supplementary ‘C-shaped’ walls to reduce torsion and optimize section’s mechanical properties. Furthermore, a life cycle analysis showed the environmental benefit of these all-wood solutions. View Full-Text
Keywords: student residence; cross-laminated timber; laminated-veneer lumber; inter-story drift; environmental footprint student residence; cross-laminated timber; laminated-veneer lumber; inter-story drift; environmental footprint
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MDPI and ACS Style

Connolly, T.; Loss, C.; Iqbal, A.; Tannert, T. Feasibility Study of Mass-Timber Cores for the UBC Tall Wood Building. Buildings 2018, 8, 98. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8080098

AMA Style

Connolly T, Loss C, Iqbal A, Tannert T. Feasibility Study of Mass-Timber Cores for the UBC Tall Wood Building. Buildings. 2018; 8(8):98. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8080098

Chicago/Turabian Style

Connolly, Thomas; Loss, Cristiano; Iqbal, Asif; Tannert, Thomas. 2018. "Feasibility Study of Mass-Timber Cores for the UBC Tall Wood Building" Buildings 8, no. 8: 98. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8080098

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