Next Article in Journal
Model Ownership and Intellectual Property Rights for Collaborative Sustainability on Building Information Modeling
Next Article in Special Issue
Crossing Contexts: Applying a System for Collaborative Investigation of School Space to Inform Design Decisions in Contrasting Settings
Previous Article in Journal
Risk Assessment of Joint Sealing Tape in Joints between Precast Concrete Sandwich Panels Resilient to Climate Change
Previous Article in Special Issue
Informal Learning Spaces in Higher Education: Student Preferences and Activities
Article

Designing and Building Robust Innovative Learning Environments

Faculty of Education and Business Studies, University of Gävle, 80176 Gävle, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Pamela Woolner and Paula Cardellino
Buildings 2021, 11(8), 345; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11080345
Received: 10 June 2021 / Revised: 2 August 2021 / Accepted: 5 August 2021 / Published: 11 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Learning Environment Design and Use)
Prior research shows that creating innovative learning spaces that work well for pupils and teachers is a challenge which implicates different stakeholders. The aim of this article is to inquire into how educational visions evolve and are expressed through the different phases of two school design processes as well as visualize how stakeholders’ roles in the processes result in innovative learning environments and practices that work well. The data consists of photographs from school visits, briefs, and interviews. The material is analyzed with a particular focus on educational vision, organization, and working methods. An analytical model showing the stakeholders’ levels of participation at each stage is revised and developed. The results indicate four common themes: Continuity (several stakeholders involved in more than one phase); Preparation (processes were long-term, continuous, and iterative, with future users testing and evaluating prototypes and other innovative interior design elements to be used in the new spaces); Alignment (early and extensive considerations of the school’s organization and working methods); and Participation (multi-professional teams with representation of a pedagogical perspective at the higher levels of participation). From this, it can be concluded that achieving robust, innovative learning environments involves stakeholders’ regard to the aspects of knowledge, education, organization, and economy. View Full-Text
Keywords: built pedagogy; educational vision; innovation; interior design; learning environment; participatory design; school building; school design; school architecture built pedagogy; educational vision; innovation; interior design; learning environment; participatory design; school building; school design; school architecture
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Frelin, A.; Grannäs, J. Designing and Building Robust Innovative Learning Environments. Buildings 2021, 11, 345. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11080345

AMA Style

Frelin A, Grannäs J. Designing and Building Robust Innovative Learning Environments. Buildings. 2021; 11(8):345. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11080345

Chicago/Turabian Style

Frelin, Anneli, and Jan Grannäs. 2021. "Designing and Building Robust Innovative Learning Environments" Buildings 11, no. 8: 345. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11080345

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop