Next Article in Journal
Simulation-Based Management of Construction Companies under the Circular Economy Concept—Case Study
Previous Article in Journal
Deformability of Glued Laminated Beams with Combined Reinforcement
Previous Article in Special Issue
Multi-objective Building Design Optimization under Operational Uncertainties Using the NSGA II Algorithm
Open AccessArticle

The Energy Cost of Cold Thermal Discomfort in the Global South

Department of Architecture & Civil Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Buildings 2020, 10(5), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10050093
Received: 3 April 2020 / Revised: 1 May 2020 / Accepted: 11 May 2020 / Published: 15 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Energy Consumption in the Global South)
The Global South, much of it in warm tropical latitudes, is expected to double its total energy demand by 2050. In addition to increased mean demand, greater demand for space cooling during external temperature peaks will exacerbate the strain on already fragile energy networks. Recent anecdotal evidence that a proportion of the increase in cooling demand is driven by cold—rather than warm—indoor thermal discomfort, suggests the imposition of an unnecessary cooling energy cost. Here, we investigate the impact of this cost on the expanding Global South using field data from four cities in India, Philippines, and Thailand. We observe that mean cold discomfort across the four cities is roughly 45 percentage points higher than warm discomfort, suggesting warmer indoor temperatures would not only lower overall discomfort but also reduce cooling energy demand. Computer simulations using a calibrated building model reveal that average savings of 10%/Kelvin and peak reductions of 3%–19%, would be feasible across the expected external temperature range in these cities. This suggests that more climatically appropriate indoor thermal comfort standards in the Global South would not only significantly counteract the expected rise in energy demand, but also produce more comfortable indoor conditions and reduce peak demand. View Full-Text
Keywords: building energy; thermal comfort; global south; cold thermal discomfort; building overcooling building energy; thermal comfort; global south; cold thermal discomfort; building overcooling
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Alnuaimi, A.N.; Natarajan, S. The Energy Cost of Cold Thermal Discomfort in the Global South. Buildings 2020, 10, 93.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop