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Article

Earthquake Safety Assessment of Buildings through Rapid Visual Screening

1
Institute of Structural Mechanics (ISM), Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, 99423 Weimar, Germany
2
School of the Built Environment, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX30BP, UK
3
Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, 130 Victoria Park Road, Kelvin Grove, QLD 4059, Australia
4
Department of Mathematics and Informatics, J. Selye University, 94501 Komarno, Slovakia
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Kalman Kando Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Obuda University, 1034 Budapest, Hungary
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Buildings 2020, 10(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10030051
Received: 5 February 2020 / Revised: 29 February 2020 / Accepted: 6 March 2020 / Published: 10 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structural Analysis for Earthquake-Resistant Design of Buildings)
Earthquake is among the most devastating natural disasters causing severe economical, environmental, and social destruction. Earthquake safety assessment and building hazard monitoring can highly contribute to urban sustainability through identification and insight into optimum materials and structures. While the vulnerability of structures mainly depends on the structural resistance, the safety assessment of buildings can be highly challenging. In this paper, we consider the Rapid Visual Screening (RVS) method, which is a qualitative procedure for estimating structural scores for buildings suitable for medium- to high-seismic cases. This paper presents an overview of the common RVS methods, i.e., FEMA P-154, IITK-GGSDMA, and EMPI. To examine the accuracy and validation, a practical comparison is performed between their assessment and observed damage of reinforced concrete buildings from a street survey in the Bingöl region, Turkey, after the 1 May 2003 earthquake. The results demonstrate that the application of RVS methods for preliminary damage estimation is a vital tool. Furthermore, the comparative analysis showed that FEMA P-154 creates an assessment that overestimates damage states and is not economically viable, while EMPI and IITK-GGSDMA provide more accurate and practical estimation, respectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: buildings; earthquake safety assessment; earthquake; extreme events; seismic assessment; natural hazard; mitigation; rapid visual screening; building defects; structural-health monitoring; survey; geohazard; hazard assessment; reinforced concrete buildings buildings; earthquake safety assessment; earthquake; extreme events; seismic assessment; natural hazard; mitigation; rapid visual screening; building defects; structural-health monitoring; survey; geohazard; hazard assessment; reinforced concrete buildings
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MDPI and ACS Style

Harirchian, E.; Lahmer, T.; Buddhiraju, S.; Mohammad, K.; Mosavi, A. Earthquake Safety Assessment of Buildings through Rapid Visual Screening. Buildings 2020, 10, 51. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10030051

AMA Style

Harirchian E, Lahmer T, Buddhiraju S, Mohammad K, Mosavi A. Earthquake Safety Assessment of Buildings through Rapid Visual Screening. Buildings. 2020; 10(3):51. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10030051

Chicago/Turabian Style

Harirchian, Ehsan, Tom Lahmer, Sreekanth Buddhiraju, Kifaytullah Mohammad, and Amir Mosavi. 2020. "Earthquake Safety Assessment of Buildings through Rapid Visual Screening" Buildings 10, no. 3: 51. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10030051

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