Next Article in Journal
Shopping When You Are Deafblind: A Pre-Technology Test of New Methods for Face-to-Face Communication—Deafblindness and Face-to-Face Communication
Next Article in Special Issue
Digitalization and Artificial Intelligence in Migration and Mobility: Transnational Implications of the COVID-19 Pandemic
Previous Article in Journal
Can Esports Substitute Traditional Sports? The Convergence of Sports and Video Gaming during the Pandemic and Beyond
Previous Article in Special Issue
Jogging during the Lockdown: Changes in the Regimes of Kinesthetic Morality and Urban Emotional Geography in NW Italy
 
 
Concept Paper

COVID-19 Stigma and Charismatic Social Relationship: A Legitimization Narrative of President Trump’s Status as a Charismatic Leader following a SARS-CoV-2 Infection Reported by the Portuguese Media

1
Interdisciplinary Centre of Social Sciences—CICS.NOVA, Estoril Higher Institute for Tourism and Hotel Studies, 2765-273 Estoril, Portugal
2
Interdisciplinary Centre for Childhood and Adolescence—NICA—UAc, Interdisciplinary Centre of Social Sciences—CICS.UAc/CICS.NOVA.UAc, Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of the Azores, 9500-321 Ponta Delgada, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Gregor Wolbring
Societies 2021, 11(4), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11040130
Received: 15 September 2021 / Revised: 12 October 2021 / Accepted: 22 October 2021 / Published: 28 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges of Post-COVID-19 for a Sustainable Development Society)
This concept paper aimed to understand how stigma, a concept usually associated with negative social relationships, in the context of a pandemic threat such as COVID-19 can, in some situations, structure a charismatic social relationship in a perceived positive association between stigma and a specific social characteristic. For this purpose, we used the example of the news selected and highlighted by several Portuguese media about the actions and messages developed by President Trump in the context of his infection with SARS-CoV-2 and the subsequent recovery process. These news reports gave visibility to a narrative that can be considered as reinforcing the legitimization of his condition as a charismatic leader in an electoral context marked by the pandemic threat. In conclusion, stigma associated with a pandemic health threat and generally linked to a negative social status can also reinforce admiration, trust, and belief in the charismatic leader by supporters and followers, as demonstrated with the plight of President Trump. Stigma can be a factor in social uplift in affirming an upward trajectory of social status and symbolic power for actors seen as ill, where stigma-motivated discrimination is experienced positively, unlike in most cases. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19 pandemic; SARS-CoV-2; stigma; stigmatization; charisma; charismatic domination; President Trump; legitimation; social elevation; media narrative; media COVID-19 pandemic; SARS-CoV-2; stigma; stigmatization; charisma; charismatic domination; President Trump; legitimation; social elevation; media narrative; media
MDPI and ACS Style

Miguel Ferreira, C.; Serpa, S. COVID-19 Stigma and Charismatic Social Relationship: A Legitimization Narrative of President Trump’s Status as a Charismatic Leader following a SARS-CoV-2 Infection Reported by the Portuguese Media. Societies 2021, 11, 130. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11040130

AMA Style

Miguel Ferreira C, Serpa S. COVID-19 Stigma and Charismatic Social Relationship: A Legitimization Narrative of President Trump’s Status as a Charismatic Leader following a SARS-CoV-2 Infection Reported by the Portuguese Media. Societies. 2021; 11(4):130. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11040130

Chicago/Turabian Style

Miguel Ferreira, Carlos, and Sandro Serpa. 2021. "COVID-19 Stigma and Charismatic Social Relationship: A Legitimization Narrative of President Trump’s Status as a Charismatic Leader following a SARS-CoV-2 Infection Reported by the Portuguese Media" Societies 11, no. 4: 130. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11040130

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop