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Article

The Prevalence and Severity of External Auditory Exostosis in Young to Quadragenarian-Aged Warm-Water Surfers: A Preliminary Study

1
Water Based Research Unit-Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD 4226, Australia
2
Independent Researcher, Concord, NSW 2137, Australia
3
School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Bilinga, QLD 4225, Australia
4
Physical Activity, Lifestyle, Ageing and Wellbeing Faculty Research Group, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2020, 8(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8020017
Received: 19 November 2019 / Revised: 23 January 2020 / Accepted: 26 January 2020 / Published: 4 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiology of Paddle Sports)
External auditory exostosis (EAE) has previously only been shown to occur in cold water surfers. We assessed young surfers living and surfing in Queensland, Australia, for EAE in water temp ranges from 20.6 °C (69.1 °F, Winter) to 28.2 °C (82.8 °F, Summer). All participants underwent a bilateral otoscopic examination to assess the presence and severity of EAE. A total of 23 surfers participated with a mean age of 35.4 years (8.3 years) and a mean surfing experience of 20.0 years (9.9 years). Nearly two-thirds of participants (n = 14, 60.9%) had regular otological symptoms, most commonly water trapping (n = 13, 56.5%), pain (n = 8, 34.8%), and hearing loss (n = 6, 26.1%). Only 8.7% (n = 2) of all surfers reported regular use of protective equipment (e.g., earplugs) on a regular basis. The overall prevalence of exostosis was 69.6% (n = 16), and the majority (n = 12, 80.0%) demonstrated bilateral lesions of a mild grade (<33% obstruction of the external auditory canal). This is the first study assessing EAE in young surfers exposed to only warm waters (above 20.6 °C). The prevalence of EAE in this study highlights that EAE is not restricted to cold water conditions, as previously believed. Warm water surfing enthusiasts should be screened on a regular basis by their general medical practitioner and utilize prevention strategies such as earplugs to minimize exposure to EAE development. View Full-Text
Keywords: auditory exostoses; surfing; surfer’s ear; otology; preventive medicine; sports medicine auditory exostoses; surfing; surfer’s ear; otology; preventive medicine; sports medicine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Simas, V.; Hing, W.; Furness, J.; Walsh, J.; Climstein, M. The Prevalence and Severity of External Auditory Exostosis in Young to Quadragenarian-Aged Warm-Water Surfers: A Preliminary Study. Sports 2020, 8, 17. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8020017

AMA Style

Simas V, Hing W, Furness J, Walsh J, Climstein M. The Prevalence and Severity of External Auditory Exostosis in Young to Quadragenarian-Aged Warm-Water Surfers: A Preliminary Study. Sports. 2020; 8(2):17. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8020017

Chicago/Turabian Style

Simas, Vini, Wayne Hing, James Furness, Joe Walsh, and Mike Climstein. 2020. "The Prevalence and Severity of External Auditory Exostosis in Young to Quadragenarian-Aged Warm-Water Surfers: A Preliminary Study" Sports 8, no. 2: 17. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8020017

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