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The Impact of an Ice Slurry-Induced Gastrointestinal Heat Sink on Gastrointestinal and Rectal Temperatures Following Exercise

1
Faculty of Physical Activity Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1, Canada
2
Research Centre on Aging, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1H 4C4, Canada
3
Institut National des Sciences Appliquées, Université de Toulouse, 31400 Toulouse, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2019, 7(9), 198; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7090198
Received: 30 June 2019 / Revised: 11 August 2019 / Accepted: 22 August 2019 / Published: 27 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Detection of Physiological Parameters in Humans during Exercise)
Gastrointestinal temperature (Tgint) measurement with a telemetric pill (TP) is increasingly used in exercise science. Contact of cool water with a TP invalidates Tgint assessment. However, what effect a heat sink created in the proximity of a TP may have on the assessment of Tgint remains unknown. We examined the impact of an ice slurry-induced heat sink on Tgint and rectal temperature (Trec) following exercise. After 20 min of seating (20–22 °C, 25–40% relative humidity (RH)), 11 men completed two intersperse exercise periods (31–32 °C, 35% RH) at 75–80% of estimated maximal heart rate until a Trec increase of 1 °C above baseline level. Following the first exercise period, participants were seated for 45 min and ingested 7.5 g·kg−1 of thermoneutral water, whereas, following the second period, they ingested 7.5 g·kg−1 of ice slurry. Both Tgint and Trec were measured continuously. The TPs were swallowed 10 h prior to the experiments. A bias ≤0.27 °C was taken as an indication that Tgint and Trec provided similar core temperature indices. Mean biases and 95% limits of agreement during passive sitting, first exercise, water ingestion, second exercise, and ice slurry ingestion periods were 0.16 ± 0.53, 0.13 ± 0.41, 0.21 ± 0.70, 0.17 ± 0.50, and 0.18 ± 0.66 °C, respectively. The rates of decrease in Tgint and Trec did not differ between the water and ice slurry ingestion periods. Our results indicate that ice slurry ingestion following exercise does not impact TP-derived assessment of Tgint compared with Trec. View Full-Text
Keywords: core body temperature; exercise; heat stress; ice slurry ingestion; telemetry; temperature measurement core body temperature; exercise; heat stress; ice slurry ingestion; telemetry; temperature measurement
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Deshayes, T.A.; De La Flore, A.; Gosselin, J.; Beliveau, J.; Jeker, D.; Goulet, E.D. The Impact of an Ice Slurry-Induced Gastrointestinal Heat Sink on Gastrointestinal and Rectal Temperatures Following Exercise. Sports 2019, 7, 198.

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