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Open AccessArticle

Agreement between the Open Barbell and Tendo Linear Position Transducers for Monitoring Barbell Velocity during Resistance Exercise

1
Department of Health Professions, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549, USA
2
Department of Exercise Science and Sport Management, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA 30144 USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2019, 7(5), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7050125
Received: 17 April 2019 / Revised: 10 May 2019 / Accepted: 20 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
To determine the agreement between the Open Barbell (OB) and Tendo weightlifting analyzer (TWA) for measuring barbell velocity, eleven men (19.4 ± 1.0 y) performed one set of 2–3 repetitions at four sub-maximal percentage loads, [i.e., 30, 50, 70, and 90% one-repetition maximum (1RM)] in the back (BS) and front squat (FS) exercises. During each repetition, peak and mean barbell velocity were recorded by OB and TWA devices, and the average of the 2–3 repetitions was used for analyses. Although the repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significantly (p ≤ 0.005) greater peak and mean velocity scores from OB across all intensities, high intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,K = 0.790–0.998), low standard error of measurement (SEM2,K = 0.040–0.119 m·s−1), and coefficients of variation (CV = 2–4%) suggested consistency between devices. Positive (r = 0.491–0.949) Pearson correlations between averages and differences (between devices) in peak velocity, as well as associated Bland-Altman plots, showed greater differences occurred as the velocity increased, particularly at low-moderate intensity loads. OB consistently provides greater barbell velocity scores compared to TWA, and the differences between devices were more apparent as the peak velocity increased with low-to-moderate loads. Strength coaches and athletes may find better agreement between devices if the mean velocity scores are only considered. View Full-Text
Keywords: velocity-based training; bar speed; movement velocity; weightlifting; squat velocity-based training; bar speed; movement velocity; weightlifting; squat
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Gonzalez, A.M.; Mangine, G.T.; Spitz, R.W.; Ghigiarelli, J.J.; Sell, K.M. Agreement between the Open Barbell and Tendo Linear Position Transducers for Monitoring Barbell Velocity during Resistance Exercise. Sports 2019, 7, 125.

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