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Open AccessArticle

Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio in Female Athletes with a Previous Hamstring Injury, Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, and Controls

1
Laboratory of Neuromechanics, Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences at Serres, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 62100 Thessaloniki, Greece
2
Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics, General Hospital Papageorgiou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Medical School, 56403 Thessaloniki, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2019, 7(10), 214; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7100214
Received: 23 July 2019 / Revised: 22 September 2019 / Accepted: 26 September 2019 / Published: 28 September 2019
Muscle strength imbalances around the knee are often observed in athletes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery and hamstring muscle injury. This study examined three hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H:Q) strength ratio types (conventional, functional, and mixed) in thirteen female athletes with a history of hamstring injury, fourteen basketball players following ACL reconstruction and 34 controls. The conventional (concentric H:Q) peak torque ratio was evaluated at 120°·s−1 and 240°·s−1. The functional (eccentric hamstring to concentric quadriceps) torque ratio was evaluated at 120°·s−1. Finally, the mixed (eccentric hamstrings at 30°·s−1 to concentric quadriceps at 240°·s−1) torque ratio was calculated. Both ACL and the hamstring-injured groups showed a lower quadriceps and hamstrings strength compared with controls (p < 0.05). However, non-significant group differences in the H:Q ratio were found (p > 0.05). Isokinetic assessment of muscle strength may be useful for setting appropriate targets of training programs for athletes with a history of ACL surgery or hamstring strain. However, isokinetic evaluation of the H:Q ratio is not injury—specific and it does not vary between different methods of calculating the H:Q ratio. View Full-Text
Keywords: isokinetic; strength balance; mixed ratio; ACL; hamstring injury isokinetic; strength balance; mixed ratio; ACL; hamstring injury
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kellis, E.; Galanis, N.; Kofotolis, N. Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio in Female Athletes with a Previous Hamstring Injury, Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, and Controls. Sports 2019, 7, 214. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7100214

AMA Style

Kellis E, Galanis N, Kofotolis N. Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio in Female Athletes with a Previous Hamstring Injury, Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, and Controls. Sports. 2019; 7(10):214. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7100214

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kellis, Eleftherios; Galanis, Nikiforos; Kofotolis, Nikolaos. 2019. "Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio in Female Athletes with a Previous Hamstring Injury, Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, and Controls" Sports 7, no. 10: 214. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7100214

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