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Case Report

Changes in Pain and Nutritional Intake Modulate Ultra-Running Performance: A Case Report

1
Centre for Sport Science & Human Performance, Waikato Institute of Technology, Hamilton 3288, New Zealand
2
School of Health and Social Care, Teesside University, Middlesbrough TS3 1BX, UK
3
Full Potential Performance Ltd., Plymouth PL4 0RA, UK
4
Freelance Dietician, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1, UK [email protected]
5
Teesside Sport, Teesside University, Middlesbrough TS3 1BX, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2018, 6(4), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040111
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 18 September 2018 / Accepted: 28 September 2018 / Published: 4 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise Physiology and Sport Psychology in Competition Sports)
Ultra-endurance running provides numerous physiological, psychological, and nutritional challenges to the athlete and supporting practitioners. We describe the changes in physiological status, psychological condition, and nutritional intake over the course of two 100-mile running races, with differing outcomes: non-completion and completion. Athlete perception of pain, freshness, and motivation differed between events, independent of rating of perceived exertion. Our data suggest that the integration of multiple sensations (freshness, motivation, hunger, pain, and thirst) produce performance. Increases in carbohydrate feeding (+5 g·h−1) and protein intake (+0.3 g·kg−1) also likely contributed to successful completion of a 100-mile race, by reducing the fractional utilization of maximal oxygen uptake and satiating hunger, respectively. Nutritional data support the notion that the gut is a trainable, and critical organ with respect to ultra-endurance performance. Finally, we propose future research to investigate the rate at which peak feeding occurs throughout ultra-endurance events, as this may further serve to personalize sports nutrition strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: ultra-endurance; running; nutrition ultra-endurance; running; nutrition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Best, R.; Barwick, B.; Best, A.; Berger, N.; Harrison, C.; Wright, M.; Sparrow, J. Changes in Pain and Nutritional Intake Modulate Ultra-Running Performance: A Case Report. Sports 2018, 6, 111. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040111

AMA Style

Best R, Barwick B, Best A, Berger N, Harrison C, Wright M, Sparrow J. Changes in Pain and Nutritional Intake Modulate Ultra-Running Performance: A Case Report. Sports. 2018; 6(4):111. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040111

Chicago/Turabian Style

Best, Russ, Benjamin Barwick, Alice Best, Nicolas Berger, Claire Harrison, Matthew Wright, and Julie Sparrow. 2018. "Changes in Pain and Nutritional Intake Modulate Ultra-Running Performance: A Case Report" Sports 6, no. 4: 111. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040111

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