Next Article in Journal
A New Approach to EMG Analysis of Closed-Circuit Movements Such as the Flat Bench Press
Next Article in Special Issue
Testosterone and Cortisol Responses to Five High-Intensity Functional Training Competition Workouts in Recreationally Active Adults
Previous Article in Journal
The Effect of Environmental Conditions on the Physiological Response during a Stand-Up Paddle Surfing Session
Open AccessArticle

Are Changes in Physical Work Capacity Induced by High-Intensity Functional Training Related to Changes in Associated Physiologic Measures?

1
Department of Health, Human Performance, and Recreation, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS 66763, USA
2
Functional Intensity Training Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2018, 6(2), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6020026
Received: 8 March 2018 / Revised: 21 March 2018 / Accepted: 23 March 2018 / Published: 27 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on High Intensity Functional Training)
High-Intensity Functional Training (HIFT) is a novel exercise intervention that may test body systems in a balanced and integrated fashion by challenging individuals’ abilities to complete mechanical work. However, research has not previously determined if physical work capacity is unique to traditional physiologic measures of fitness. Twenty-five healthy men and women completed a six-week HIFT intervention with physical work capacity and various physiologic measures of fitness assessed pre- and post-intervention. At baseline, these physiologic measures of fitness (e.g., aerobic capacity) were significantly associated with physical work capacity and this relationship was even stronger at post-intervention assessment. Further, there were significant improvements across these physiologic measures in response to the delivered intervention. However, the change in these physiologic measures failed to predict the change in physical work capacity induced via HIFT. These findings point to the potential utility of HIFT as a unique challenge to individuals’ physiology beyond traditional resistance or aerobic training. Elucidating the translational impact of increasing work capacity via HIFT may be of great interest to health and fitness practitioners ranging from strength/conditioning coaches to physical therapists. View Full-Text
Keywords: High-Intensity Functional Training; work capacity; performance High-Intensity Functional Training; work capacity; performance
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Crawford, D.A.; Drake, N.B.; Carper, M.J.; DeBlauw, J.; Heinrich, K.M. Are Changes in Physical Work Capacity Induced by High-Intensity Functional Training Related to Changes in Associated Physiologic Measures? Sports 2018, 6, 26. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6020026

AMA Style

Crawford DA, Drake NB, Carper MJ, DeBlauw J, Heinrich KM. Are Changes in Physical Work Capacity Induced by High-Intensity Functional Training Related to Changes in Associated Physiologic Measures? Sports. 2018; 6(2):26. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6020026

Chicago/Turabian Style

Crawford, Derek A.; Drake, Nicholas B.; Carper, Michael J.; DeBlauw, Justin; Heinrich, Katie M. 2018. "Are Changes in Physical Work Capacity Induced by High-Intensity Functional Training Related to Changes in Associated Physiologic Measures?" Sports 6, no. 2: 26. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6020026

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop