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Maximum Strength, Rate of Force Development, Jump Height, and Peak Power Alterations in Weightlifters across Five Months of Training

1
Department of Coaching and Teaching Studies, West Virginia University, 375 Birch Street, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
2
Department of Sport, Exercise, Recreation, and Kinesiology, East Tennessee State University, 1276 Gilbreath Drive, Johnson City, TN 37614, USA
3
Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies, Coastal Carolina University, Williams-Brice 111, Conway, SC 29526, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2017, 5(4), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports5040078
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 29 September 2017 / Accepted: 3 October 2017 / Published: 13 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Strength on Performance in Athletic Tasks)
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Abstract

The purpose of this monitoring study was to investigate how alterations in training affect changes in force-related characteristics and weightlifting performance. Subjects: Seven competitive weightlifters participated in the study. Methods: The weightlifters performed a block style periodized plan across 20 weeks. Force plate data from the isometric mid-thigh pull and static jumps with 0 kg, 11 kg, and 20 kg were collected near the end of each training block (weeks 1, 6, 10, 13, 17, and 20). Weightlifting performance was measured at weeks 0, 7, 11, and 20. Results: Very strong correlations were noted between weightlifting performances and isometric rate of force development (RFD), isometric peak force (PF), peak power (PP), and jump height (JH). Men responded in a more predictable manner than the women. During periods of higher training volume, RFD was depressed to a greater extent than PF. JH at 20 kg responded in a manner reflecting the expected fatigue response more so than JH at 0 kg and 11 kg. Conclusions: PF appears to have been more resistant to volume alterations than RFD and JH at 20 kg. RFD and JH at 20 kg appear to be superior monitoring metrics due to their “sensitivity.” View Full-Text
Keywords: weightlifters; block periodization; athlete monitoring; rate of force development; peak force; vertical jump; isometric mid-thigh pull weightlifters; block periodization; athlete monitoring; rate of force development; peak force; vertical jump; isometric mid-thigh pull
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Hornsby, W.G.; Gentles, J.A.; MacDonald, C.J.; Mizuguchi, S.; Ramsey, M.W.; Stone, M.H. Maximum Strength, Rate of Force Development, Jump Height, and Peak Power Alterations in Weightlifters across Five Months of Training. Sports 2017, 5, 78.

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