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Open AccessArticle

Effectiveness of Different Rest Intervals Following Whole-Body Vibration on Vertical Jump Performance between College Athletes and Recreationally Trained Females

1
Biomechanics and Sport Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, California State University, San Bernardino, 5500 University Parkway, San Bernardino, CA 92407, USA
2
Applied Biomechanics Laboratory, Health, Exercise Science, and Recreation Management Department; The University of Mississippi, P.O. Box 1848, Oxford, MS 38677, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Lee E. Brown
Sports 2015, 3(3), 258-268; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports3030258
Received: 4 August 2015 / Revised: 14 September 2015 / Accepted: 15 September 2015 / Published: 18 September 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strength and Conditioning)
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different rest intervals following whole-body vibration on counter-movement vertical jump performance. Sixteen females, eight recreationally trained and eight varsity athletes volunteered to participate in four testing visits separated by 24 h. Visit one acted as a familiarization visit where subjects were introduced to the counter-movement vertical jump and whole-body vibration protocols. Visits 2–4 contained 2 randomized conditions. Whole-body vibration was administered in four bouts of 30 s with 30 s rest between bouts. During whole-body vibration subjects performed a quarter squat every 5 s, simulating a counter-movement vertical jump. Whole-body vibration was followed by three counter-movement vertical jumps with five different rest intervals between the vibration exposure and jumping. For a control condition, subjects performed squats with no whole-body vibration. There was a significant (p < 0.05) main effect for time for vertical jump height, peak power output, and relative ground reaction forces, where a majority of individuals max jump from all whole-body vibration conditions was greater than the control condition. There were significant (p < 0.05) group differences, showing that varsity athletes had a greater vertical jump height and peak power output compared to recreationally trained females. There were no significant (p > 0.05) group differences for relative ground reaction forces. Practitioners and/or strength and conditioning coaches may utilize whole-body vibration to enhance acute counter-movement vertical jump performance after identifying individuals optimal rest time in order to maximize the potentiating effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: rest time; counter-movement; warm-up; athletic women rest time; counter-movement; warm-up; athletic women
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Dabbs, N.C.; Lundahl, J.A.; Garner, J.C. Effectiveness of Different Rest Intervals Following Whole-Body Vibration on Vertical Jump Performance between College Athletes and Recreationally Trained Females. Sports 2015, 3, 258-268.

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