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Jamaica’s Critically Endangered Butterfly: A Review of the Biology and Conservation Status of the Homerus Swallowtail (Papilio (Pterourus) homerus Fabricius)
Open AccessCase Report

Successful Community-Based Conservation: The Story of Millbank and Pterourus (Papilio) homerus

1
Department of Life Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7, JMAAW15, Jamaica
2
Department of Biology, Chemistry, and Environment Sciences, Northern Caribbean University, Mandeville JMDMR17, Jamaica
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
1962–1985 (Retired), Department of Zoology, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica
Academic Editor: Jaret C. Daniels
Insects 2017, 8(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects8030069
Received: 28 March 2017 / Revised: 29 May 2017 / Accepted: 13 June 2017 / Published: 14 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Butterfly Conservation)
The literature on community-based environmental management is very extensive and the discussion of the pros and cons is continuing. Presented here is an example of a successful interaction between university-based entomologists and a local rural community, detailing the change in the attitude of the town of Millbank, Jamaica, from a Giant Swallowtail Butterfly collecting site to a model for community protection of a species and its environment. A review of some of the research work on community-based conservation efforts is included. These linkages take a considerable time to establish and the efforts spent by scientific personnel, governmental representatives and eco-tourists are itemized to emphasize how specific conservation activities have inspired confidence in the local community, thus engendering trust and mutual respect between the two groups. Reviews of the developed legislative support from both international and state entities also must be in place, and these are included in chronological detail as much as possible. Finally, a review of the long-term funding of educational and other local programs providing a level of stability to the conservation effort, until the local community can take over the protection of the species and/or habitat, is provided. Of utmost importance is a comprehensive educational campaign to not only sensitize the community, but the larger society, so that there can be buy-in from all stakeholders. View Full-Text
Keywords: Jamaica; giant; swallowtail; butterfly; ecotourism; indigenous; ecological knowledge Jamaica; giant; swallowtail; butterfly; ecotourism; indigenous; ecological knowledge
MDPI and ACS Style

Garraway, E.; Parnell, J.; Lewis, D.S. Successful Community-Based Conservation: The Story of Millbank and Pterourus (Papilio) homerus. Insects 2017, 8, 69.

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