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Article

Isolation in Natural Host Cell Lines of Wolbachia Strains wPip from the Mosquito Culex pipiens and wPap from the Sand Fly Phlebotomus papatasi

1
Department of Infection Biology and Microbiomes, Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L3 5RF, UK
2
The Pirbright Institute, Pirbright, Surrey GU24 0NF, UK
3
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
4
Vector Biology Department, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK
5
Division of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster University, Lancashire LA1 4YG, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mike J. Goblirsch, Wayne B. Hunter, Rosemarie C. Rosell and Brian T. Forschler
Insects 2021, 12(10), 871; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12100871
Received: 20 July 2021 / Revised: 25 August 2021 / Accepted: 21 September 2021 / Published: 26 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Use of Insect Cell Culture and Biotechnology)
Diverse strains of Wolbachia bacteria, carried by many arthropods, as well as some nematodes, interact in many different ways with their hosts. These include male killing, reproductive incompatibility, nutritional supplementation and suppression or enhancement of the transmission of diseases such as dengue and malaria. Consequently, Wolbachia have an important role to play in novel strategies to control human and livestock diseases and their vectors. Similarly, cell lines derived from insect hosts of Wolbachia constitute valuable research tools in this field. During the generation of novel cell lines from mosquito and sand fly vectors, we isolated two strains of Wolbachia and demonstrated their infectivity for cells from a range of other insects and ticks. These new insect cell lines and Wolbachia strains will aid in the fight against mosquitoes, sand flies and, potentially, ticks and the diseases that these arthropods transmit to humans and their domestic animals.
Endosymbiotic intracellular bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are harboured by many species of invertebrates. They display a wide range of developmental, metabolic and nutritional interactions with their hosts and may impact the transmission of arboviruses and protozoan parasites. Wolbachia have occasionally been isolated during insect cell line generation. Here, we report the isolation of two strains of Wolbachia, wPip and wPap, during cell line generation from their respective hosts, the mosquito Culex pipiens and the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi. wPip was pathogenic for both new C. pipiens cell lines, CPE/LULS50 and CLP/LULS56, requiring tetracycline treatment to rescue the lines. In contrast, wPap was tolerated by the P. papatasi cell line PPL/LULS49, although tetracycline treatment was applied to generate a Wolbachia-free subline. Both Wolbachia strains were infective for a panel of heterologous insect and tick cell lines, including two novel lines generated from the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, LLE/LULS45 and LLL/LULS52. In all cases, wPip was more pathogenic for the host cells than wPap. These newly isolated Wolbachia strains, and the novel mosquito and sand fly cell lines reported here, will add to the resources available for research on host–endosymbiont relationships, as well as on C. pipiens, P. papatasi, L. longipalpis and the pathogens that they transmit. View Full-Text
Keywords: mosquito; sand fly; tick cell line; Wolbachia; Culex pipiens; Phlebotomus papatasi; Lutzomyia longipalpis; Culicoides nubeculosus mosquito; sand fly; tick cell line; Wolbachia; Culex pipiens; Phlebotomus papatasi; Lutzomyia longipalpis; Culicoides nubeculosus
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bell-Sakyi, L.; Beliavskaia, A.; Hartley, C.S.; Jones, L.; Luu, L.; Haines, L.R.; Hamilton, J.G.C.; Darby, A.C.; Makepeace, B.L. Isolation in Natural Host Cell Lines of Wolbachia Strains wPip from the Mosquito Culex pipiens and wPap from the Sand Fly Phlebotomus papatasi. Insects 2021, 12, 871. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12100871

AMA Style

Bell-Sakyi L, Beliavskaia A, Hartley CS, Jones L, Luu L, Haines LR, Hamilton JGC, Darby AC, Makepeace BL. Isolation in Natural Host Cell Lines of Wolbachia Strains wPip from the Mosquito Culex pipiens and wPap from the Sand Fly Phlebotomus papatasi. Insects. 2021; 12(10):871. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12100871

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bell-Sakyi, Lesley, Alexandra Beliavskaia, Catherine S. Hartley, Laura Jones, Lisa Luu, Lee R. Haines, James G.C. Hamilton, Alistair C. Darby, and Benjamin L. Makepeace. 2021. "Isolation in Natural Host Cell Lines of Wolbachia Strains wPip from the Mosquito Culex pipiens and wPap from the Sand Fly Phlebotomus papatasi" Insects 12, no. 10: 871. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12100871

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