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Article

Evaluation of a Non-Chemical Compared to a Non-Chemical Plus Silica Gel Approach to Bed Bug Management

Department of Entomology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2020, 11(7), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11070443
Received: 17 May 2020 / Revised: 23 June 2020 / Accepted: 10 July 2020 / Published: 14 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology and Management of Bed Bugs)
Bed bug resistance to commonly used pesticide sprays has led to exploring new pesticides and other strategies for bed bug management. Non-chemical methods are effective in bed bug management; however, they do not provide residual protection. Compared to insecticide sprays, dust formulations are considered to provide longer residual control. We evaluated two bed bug management programs in apartment buildings. A building-wide inspection was initially conducted to identify bed bug infested apartments. Selected apartments were divided into two treatment groups: non-chemical plus silica gel dust treatment (10 apartments) and non-chemical treatment (11 apartments). After initial treatment, apartments were re-visited monthly for up to 6 months. During each visit, the total bed bug count per apartment was obtained by examining interceptor traps placed in the apartments and conducting a visual inspection. Mean bed bug count was reduced by 99% and 89% in non-chemical plus silica gel dust and non-chemical treatment, respectively. Non-chemical plus silica gel dust treatment caused significantly higher bed bug count reduction than the non-chemical treatment at 6 months. Bed bugs were eradicated from 40% and 36% of apartments treated with non-chemical plus silica gel dust treatment and non-chemical treatment, respectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cimex lectularius; silica gel; non-chemical treatment Cimex lectularius; silica gel; non-chemical treatment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Abbar, S.; Wang, C.; Cooper, R. Evaluation of a Non-Chemical Compared to a Non-Chemical Plus Silica Gel Approach to Bed Bug Management. Insects 2020, 11, 443. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11070443

AMA Style

Abbar S, Wang C, Cooper R. Evaluation of a Non-Chemical Compared to a Non-Chemical Plus Silica Gel Approach to Bed Bug Management. Insects. 2020; 11(7):443. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11070443

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abbar, Salehe, Changlu Wang, and Richard Cooper. 2020. "Evaluation of a Non-Chemical Compared to a Non-Chemical Plus Silica Gel Approach to Bed Bug Management" Insects 11, no. 7: 443. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11070443

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