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Article

Low Friction and High Solid-Solid Contact Ratio—A Contradiction for Laser-Patterned Surfaces?

1
Chair of Functional Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken, Germany
2
INM—Leibniz Institute for New Materials, 66123 Saarbruecken, Germany
3
Center for Memory and Recording Research, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Lubricants 2017, 5(3), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants5030035
Received: 1 August 2017 / Revised: 24 August 2017 / Accepted: 25 August 2017 / Published: 26 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improvement of Friction and Wear by Laser Surface Texturing)
Recording of Stribeck-like curves is a common way to study the effect of laser-patterned surfaces on the frictional efficiency. However, solely relying on the coefficient of friction when identifying the lubrication regime and the underlying working principles can be misleading. Consequently, a ball-on-disc tribometer was combined with an electrical resistivity circuit to simultaneously measure Stribeck-like curves and solid-solid contact ratios for polished and laser-patterned samples. Line-like surface patterns with different periodicities were produced by direct laser interference patterning on steel substrates (AISI304). The reference shows a Stribeck-like behavior well correlating with the contact ratios. The behavior deviates for high sliding velocities (high contact ratios) due to a loss of lubricant induced by centrifugal forces pulling the lubricant out of the contact zone. In contrast, the solid–solid contact ratio of the laser-patterned samples is around 80% for all sliding velocities. Those values can be explained by higher contact pressures and the structural depth induced by the surface topography which make a full separation of the surfaces unlikely. Despite those high values for the contact ratio, laser-patterning significantly reduces friction, which can be traced back to a reduced real contact area and the ability to store oil in the contact zone. View Full-Text
Keywords: laser surface patterning; friction reduction; solid–solid contact ratio; lubrication regimes laser surface patterning; friction reduction; solid–solid contact ratio; lubrication regimes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bettscheider, S.; Grützmacher, P.G.; Rosenkranz, A. Low Friction and High Solid-Solid Contact Ratio—A Contradiction for Laser-Patterned Surfaces? Lubricants 2017, 5, 35. https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants5030035

AMA Style

Bettscheider S, Grützmacher PG, Rosenkranz A. Low Friction and High Solid-Solid Contact Ratio—A Contradiction for Laser-Patterned Surfaces? Lubricants. 2017; 5(3):35. https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants5030035

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bettscheider, Simon, Philipp G. Grützmacher, and Andreas Rosenkranz. 2017. "Low Friction and High Solid-Solid Contact Ratio—A Contradiction for Laser-Patterned Surfaces?" Lubricants 5, no. 3: 35. https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants5030035

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