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J. Pers. Med. 2018, 8(3), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm8030024

Physician-Reported Benefits and Barriers to Clinical Implementation of Genomic Medicine: A Multi-Site IGNITE-Network Survey

1
The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine and Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA
2
Pharmacy Department, The Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY 10029, USA
3
Center for Health Equity and Community-Engaged Research, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA
4
Department of Population Health Science and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA
5
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, 950 W. Walnut Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
6
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, University of Florida College of Pharmacy, Gainesville, FL 32640, USA
7
Program for Personalized and Genomic Medicine, Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
8
Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 April 2018 / Revised: 12 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 24 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genomic Medicine and Policy)
Full-Text   |   PDF [238 KB, uploaded 24 July 2018]

Abstract

Genetic medicine is one of the key components of personalized medicine, but adoption in clinical practice is still limited. To understand potential barriers and provider attitudes, we surveyed 285 physicians from five Implementing GeNomics In pracTicE (IGNITE) sites about their perceptions as to the clinical utility of genetic data as well as their preparedness to integrate it into practice. These responses were also analyzed in comparison to the type of study occurring at the physicians’ institution (pharmacogenetics versus disease genetics). The majority believed that genetic testing is clinically useful; however, only a third believed that they had obtained adequate training to care for genetically “high-risk” patients. Physicians involved in pharmacogenetics initiatives were more favorable towards genetic testing applications; they found it to be clinically useful and felt more prepared and confident in their abilities to adopt it into their practice in comparison to those participating in disease genetics initiatives. These results suggest that investigators should explore which attributes of clinical pharmacogenetics (such as the use of simplified genetics-guided recommendations) can be implemented to improve attitudes and preparedness to implement disease genetics in care. Most physicians felt unprepared to use genetic information in their practice; accordingly, major steps should be taken to develop effective clinical tools and training strategies for physicians. View Full-Text
Keywords: genetic medicine; pharmacogenetics; chronic disease; genetic testing; physician attitudes; barriers; clinical implementation; clinical utility; physician education genetic medicine; pharmacogenetics; chronic disease; genetic testing; physician attitudes; barriers; clinical implementation; clinical utility; physician education
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Owusu Obeng, A.; Fei, K.; Levy, K.D.; Elsey, A.R.; Pollin, T.I.; Ramirez, A.H.; Weitzel, K.W.; Horowitz, C.R. Physician-Reported Benefits and Barriers to Clinical Implementation of Genomic Medicine: A Multi-Site IGNITE-Network Survey. J. Pers. Med. 2018, 8, 24.

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